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AgweekTV Full Show: Supreme Court and ag, WASDE numbers, farm safety and China trade

AgweekTV for Jan. 15-16, 2021.

We are part of The Trust Project.

Coming up on AgweekTV we will discuss the Supreme Court moving on two cases important to agriculture. We will discuss the USDA releasing a handful of reports, including the final WASDE production numbers. We'll visit NDSU Extension and discuss an important program for farmers and ranchers. Finally, we'll see the ag secretary announcing China trade actions and new conservation programs.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV

THE SUPREME COURT MOVES ON TWO CASES IMPORTANT TO AGRICULTURE.

USDA RELEASES A HANDFUL OF REPORTS, INCLUDING THE FINAL WASDE PRODUCTION NUMBERS.

EmilyBeal: WE'LL VISIT NDSU EXTENSION, AND DISCUSS AN IMPORTANT PROGRAM FOR FARMERS AND RANCHERS.

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AND THE AG SECRETARY ANNOUNCES CHINA TRADE ACTIONS AND NEW CONSERVATION PROGRAMS.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M MICHELLE ROOK. IT'S GREAT TO HAVE YOU JOINING US AS WE BEGIN OUR 8TH SEASON.

THIS WEEK, WE'RE COMING TO YOU FROM THE 53RD ANNUAL PORK CONGRESS IN SIOUX FALLS, SOUTH DAKOTA.

THE 2022 ANNUAL MEETING AND TRADE SHOW FEATURED 209 COMMERCIAL BOOTH DISPLAYS REPRESENTING 161 EXHIBITORS. THE ROBUST GROWTH IN THE PORK INDUSTRY IN THE REGION WAS EVIDENT WITH THE HIGH LEVEL OF PARTICIPATION IN THE TRADE SHOW AND SEMINARS.

Cagney Effling: I think that people are just realizing that there's a lot of opportunity for them and that it's, the systems are something that are manageable for them to do on their operations.

A LOT OF GROWTH IS YOUNGER PRODUCERS THAT ARE FINDING A WAY TO GET INTO THIS CAPITAL INTENSE INDUSTRY THROUGH PORK PRODUCTION.

PORK PRODUCERS ARE FACING A FEW CHALLENGES TO START THE NEW YEAR INCLUDING THE FIGHT AGAINST PROPOSITION 12, WHICH WENT INTO EFFECT IN CALIFORNIA ON JANUARY 1ST.

THE MEASURE REQUIRES ALL PORK SOLD IN THE STATE TO COME FROM SOWS THAT ARE NOT HOUSED IN GESTATION CRATES. CALIFORNIA IS A LARGE MARKET FOR PORK, SO IT WILL BE COSTLY TO PRODUCERS IN OUR REGION, ESPECIALLY IF THEY CHANGE THEIR PRODUCTION SYSTEM.

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\u0009THE NATIONAL PORK PRODUCERS COUNCIL BROUGHT A LAWSUIT AGAINST PROP 12, AS IT VIOLATES THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE CLAUSE. THE SUPREME COURT WILL DECIDE ON JANUARY 18TH IF THEY WILL HEAR THE CASE.

Bryan Humphreys: If they choose to hear it there will be briefs that will need to be filed, oral arguments presented possible and then we'll have a ruling some time mid-summer.

THE OTHER CHALLENGE IS THE SLOWDOWN IN SLAUGHTER IN THE PROCESSING PLANTS TIED TO COVID.

Shane Odegaard: Some labor issues are starting to pop here and there, both on the inspection side of it and on the processing end of it. And so hopefully we can get through this without having any harvest shutdowns.

HOWEVER, THE LABOR ISSUES ARE EXPECTED TO BE A TEMPORARY HICCUP RATHER THAN A FULL MELTDOWN LIKE IN 2020.

USDA RELEASED A SLEW OF DATA THIS WEEK INCLUDING THE WASDE, QUARTERLY STOCKS, AND SMALL GRAIN SEEDINGS.

U.S. SOYBEAN PRODUCTION AND ENDING STOCKS WERE RAISED 10 MILLION BUSHELS IN THE REPORT, BUT USDA CUT BRAZIL AND ARGENTINA PRODUCTION BY A COMBINED 8 MILLION METRIC TONS.

USDA RAISED U.S. CORN ENDING STOCK BY 47 MILLION BUSHELS FROM DECEMBER. PLUS, BRAZIL CORN PRODUCTION WAS LOWERED BY 3 MILLION METRIC TONS.

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AND WINTER WHEAT SEEDINGS WERE UP 2-PERCENT FROM LAST YEAR AT 34.4 MILLION ACRES. U.S. CARRYOUT WAS RAISED BY 30 MILLION BUSHELS.

JOINING US WITH REPORT ANALYSIS IS PAT VON TERSCH. PAT, SOYBEAN PRODUCTION AND ENDING STOCKS NOT ADJUSTED MUCH ON A U.S. BASIS, SO REALLY THIS REPORT DUG INTO SOUTH AMERICAN NUMBERS, AND A PRETTY GOOD DROP THERE IN SOYBEAN PRODUCTION.

Pat Von Tersch : YEAH, EXACTLY. THE U.S.D.A. WAS MORE AGGRESSIVE THAN WE THOUGHT THEY WERE GOING TO BE IN TERMS OF DROPPING THE SIZE OF THAT SOUTH AMERICAN CROP, PARTICULARLY THE ARGENTINE SOYBEAN CROP, AND SO THEY GOT A LITTLE CLOSER IN LINE WITH SOME OF THE PRIVATE ANALYSTS ESTIMATES THAT WERE COMING OUT PRE-REPORT, AND SO THAT'S INTERESTING. AND I DO THINK AS WE MOVE PAST GETTING THESE FINAL CROP NUMBERS IN, THE MARKETPLACE IS LIKELY TO FOCUS EVEN MORE ON SOUTH AMERICA WEATHER AS WE GO FORWARD HERE.

SO IF THE RAIN EVENT THAT THE MARKET'S BEEN EXPECTING IS KIND OF A BUST, COULD WE GO BACK UP AND RETEST THE HIGHS IN SOYBEANS?

Pat Von Tersch : AS WE GO THROUGH THIS LONG THREE DAY WEEKEND WITH NO MARKETS ON MONDAY, IT'LL BE INTERESTING TO SEE THE MARKET REACTION TO THE RAIN EVENTS THAT HAVE BEEN FORECASTED. AND YOU'RE RIGHT, IF WE DON'T END UP GETTING THE RAINS THAT ARE FORECAST, MICHELLE, IT'S LIKELY THAT WE WILL GO BACK AND TEST THOSE HIGHS.

SO CORN ENDING STOCKS WERE RAISED BACK ABOVE 1.5 BILLION BUSHELS, SO THAT PUTS US AT A MUCH MORE COMFORTABLE LEVEL FROM A STOCKS TO USE RATIO THEN, DOESN'T IT?

Pat Von Tersch: YEAH, WE ELEVATED THAT STOCKS TO USE RATIO UP TO TEN POINT FOUR PERCENT TO BE EXACT, AND THAT'S A MORE COMFORTABLE NUMBER THAN WHAT THE TRADE WAS ANTICIPATING. THAT'S A MORE COMFORTABLE NUMBER THAN WHAT I WAS ANTICIPATING. I WAS EXPECTING TO SEE THAT INCREASE IN ETHANOL DISAPPEARANCE. WE EXPECTED THAT BASED ON THE WEEKLY DISAPPEARANCE, BUT THE USDA DID RAISE PRODUCTION NUMBERS AND SO LARGELY OFFSET, ACTUALLY MORE THAN OFFSET THE INCREASE IN DEMAND. IF THIS MARKET WAS JUST ABOUT A U.S. MARKET IT WOULD PROBABLY BE BEARISH, BUT WE STILL HAVE SOME ISSUES GLOBALLY.

NOW WE DID SEE A DROP IN SOUTH AMERICAN PRODUCTION AS WELL ON CORN, BUT CERTAINLY NOT AS AGGRESSIVE IN ARGENTINA AS CONAB HAD.

YEAH, IT SEEMS AS THOUGH THE USDA WAS PAUSING A LITTLE BIT ON MAKING ANY AGGRESSIVE ADJUSTMENTS ON THE CORN SIDE OF THE EQUATION, SO WE'LL SEE HOW THAT PLAYS OUT, BUT THEY'LL LIKELY HAVE TO REDUCE THE SIZE OF THAT ARGENTINE CORN CROP AT SOME POINT.

THE WHEAT ENDING STOCKS WERE RAISED ABOUT THIRTY MILLION BUSHELS AND SO WE'RE PRETTY COMFORTABLE THERE AGAIN, AREN'T WE?

Pat Von Tersch: YEAH, WE GROW WHEAT ON EVERY CONTINENT ON THE PLANET, AND WE HAD A TIGHT GLOBAL STOCKS TO USE RATIO THAT EVERYONE'S MOTIVATED TO TRY TO FIX. AND SO THE GLOBAL BALANCE SHEET ON WHEAT'S GOING TO PROBABLY CONTINUE TO LOOSEN UP HERE AS WE GO AND WE'VE ENCOURAGED HIGHER PRODUCTION GLOBALLY NOW FOR A WHILE, SOME HIGHER PRICES AND SO I THINK THE WHEAT COMPLEX IS PROBABLY, YOU KNOW, FROM A TIGHT BALANCE SHEET PERSPECTIVE, IS PROBABLY THE LEAST CONCERNING OF THE MAJOR THREE.

AND WE HAVE ENCOURAGED SOME PRODUCTION HERE IN THE U.S. OBVIOUSLY WITH THE WINTER WHEAT SEEDINGS COMING IN BIGGER THAN LAST YEAR.

Pat Von Tersch: YEAH, REALLY GOOD FALL FOR THAT. AND I TELL YOU THE MATH ON PLANTING WINTER WHEAT AND FOLLOWING UP WITH A SECOND CROP OF SOYBEANS IN SOME OF THE FRINGE AREAS OF THE CORN BELT MADE A LOT OF SENSE, ESPECIALLY WHEN YOU CONSIDER FERTILIZER PRICES.

PAT VON TERSCH JOINING US WITH PROFESSIONAL AG MARKETING.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV, HOW NDSU IS WORKING TO MAKE FARMING A SAFER PROFESSION.

FARMING IS ONE OF THE MOST DANGEROUS PROFESSIONS. IN ADDITION, MOST FARM ACCIDENTS HAPPEN FAR FROM A HOSPITAL. BUT MANY OF THESE ACCIDENTS CAN BE PREVENTED.

EMILY BEAL JOINS US NOW WITH THIS WEEK'S COVER STORY, ON WHAT NDSU IS DOING TO KEEP FARMERS SAFER.

MICHELLE, NDSU EXTENSION

HASN'T HAD A FARM AND RANCH SAFETY COORDINATOR SINCE 2005. BUT THE NEED IS GREAT, SO THE LEGISLATURE FUNDED A FULL TIME SAFETY POSITION.

Angie Johnson: WHEN YOU'RE STRESSED, WHEN YOU'RE IN A HURRY, THAT'S WHEN WE TEND TO MAKE MISTAKES.

STRESS AND TIME CRUNCHES ARE COMMON ON THE FARM, BUT THEY DON'T HAVE TO LEAD TO TRAGIC MISTAKES. NDSU EXTENSION IS BEING PROACTIVE ABOUT FARM SAFETY, BY HIRING ANGIE JOHNSON AS THE NEW FARM AND RANCH SAFETY COORDINATOR.

Angie Johnson: ANYTIME WE CAN STRIVE TO PREVENT FARM RELATED INJURIES FROM HAPPENING, NOT ONLY ARE WE LOOKING AT SAVING AND IMPROVING LIVES, BUT WE'RE REALLY FOCUSED ON RURAL HEALTH CARE, BECAUSE THE REALITY IS, GETTING TO A LEVEL ONE TRAUMA CENTER IN NORTH DAKOTA IS TOUGH.

Lynette Flage: THE HEALTH AND THE SAFETY OF OUR FARMERS AND RANCHERS IS CRITICAL TO US.

EXTENSION ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR LYNETTE FLAGE SAYS THEY'RE HAPPY TO BE INVOLVED IN ACCIDENT PREVENTION.

Lynette Flage: THE STRESSES OUT THERE THAT FARMERS AND RANCHERS FACE ARE INCREDIBLE, AND WE WANTED TO MAKE SURE AGAIN WE COULD PROVIDE THAT EDUCATION, THAT UP FRONT PREVENTION.

Three feet into the grain, the downward force is 325 pounds.

JOHNSON GREW UP ON A FARM, AND CONTINUES TO RAISE CATTLE, SO SHE UNDERSTANDS THE DANGERS, EVEN WITH TASKS THAT HAVE BEEN DONE HUNDREDS, OR EVEN THOUSANDS OF TIMES. JOHNSON SAYS IT'S IMPORTANT TO UNDERSTAND THE SAFETY RISKS, AND TAKE THE TIME TO IMPLEMENT THE SAFETY MEASURES THAT CAN HELP MITIGATE RISK.

Angie Johnson: THE PERFORMANCE OF MY EQUIPMENT, IT COULD SAVE A LIFE. AND SAME WITH A SLOW MOVING VEHICLE SIGN, THE BRIGHT ORANGE TRIANGLES ON THE BACK OF EQUIPMENT. YOU CAN BUY A SIGN FOR SIXTEEN DOLLARS. FOR SIXTEEN DOLLARS YOU COULD SAVE A LIFE.

ANGIE JOHNSON WILL WORK WITH COUNTY EXTENSION AGENTS AROUND THE STATE TO COORDINATE AND IMPLEMENT SAFETY PROGRAMS.

THANKS EMILY. REMEMBER, YOU CAN ALWAYS GET MORE IN DEPTH ON OUR COVER STORY IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM .

ENVIRONMENTAL GROUPS, LED BY THE CENTER FOR FOOD SAFETY, WANT NEW LIFE GIVEN TO THEIR LAWSUIT OVER DICAMBA REGISTRATIONS.

THEY'RE ASKING A FEDERAL COURT TO LIFT A STAY AND SPEED UP THEIR LAWSUIT, WHICH DEMANDS THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY VACATE THE 2020 DICAMBA REGISTRATIONS OF ENGENIA, TAVIUM AND XTENDIMAX.

THE GROUPS FILED A MOTION IN U.S. DISTRICT COURT USING A RECENTLY RELEASED REPORT FROM EPA THAT THEY SAY DETAILS CONTINUED WIDESPREAD ALLEGED DICAMBA DAMAGE IN 2021.

THE U.S. SUPREME COURT ANNOUNCED IT WILL NOT TAKE UP AN APPEAL OF THE D.C. CIRCUIT COURT DECISION THAT STRUCK DOWN EPA'S YEAR-ROUND E15 RULE.

ETHANOL OFFICIALS SAY THE HIGH COURT DECISION IS DISAPPOINTING. THEY THINK THE COURT GOT IT WRONG BECAUSE EPA WAS WELL WITHIN THEIR AUTHORITY TO ALLOW YEAR-ROUND E15 SALES.

Monte Shaw: The D.C. Circuit took a very narrow approach to what the EPA could do which really runs counter to several other decisions. So, we thought it was ripe for the Supreme Court to overturn.

SHAW SAYS THE ONLY WAY TO MAKE CHANGES IN TIME FOR THE SUMMER DRIVING SEASON IS FOR THE STATES TO ACT TO ENSURE E15 CAN BE SOLD YEAR ROUND. LATE IN 2021, EIGHT MIDWESTERN GOVERNORS WROTE EPA ASKING FOR WAIVERS TO ALLOW SUMMER SALES OF E15.

There is authority under the Clean Air Act and it allows Governors to level the regulations between E10 and E15 for their states.

LONGER TERM, SHAW SAYS THEY'LL CONTINUE TO PRESS EPA BECAUSE THE CLEAN AIR ACT ALSO PROVIDES THE AGENCY AUTHORITY TO EXPAND E15. PLUS, THERE'S BEEN NO LEGISLATIVE FIX IN CONGRESS.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, US AG SECRETARY TOM VILSACK TALKS CHINA TRADE AND CLIMATE CHANGE.

THE ROLLER COASTER TEMPERATURE TREND HAS CONTINUED THROUGH JANUARY BUT MUCH OF THE REGION HAS BEEN FAIRLY DRY. WILL THAT CONTINUE?

HERE'S OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

AGWEEKTV SOY INSIGHT BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN COUNCIL

SOYBEANS ARE BECOMING A MORE POPULAR CROP IN WESTERN NORTH DAKOTA, BUT THERE ARE SOME CHALLENGES GROWERS NEED TO BE AWARE OF.

ROSE DUNN JOINS US NOW WITH MORE ON THE WESTERN NORTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN SCHOOLS.

AT THE SESSIONS, SOYBEAN GROWERS CAN LEARN THE LATEST PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES FOR IMPROVING YIELDS, FROM NDSU EXTENSION SPECIALISTS.

SOYBEANS ARE A RELATIVELY NEW CROP IN WESTERN NORTH DAKOTA, BUT NEW VARIETIES HAVE BEEN DEVELOPED FOR THE DRIER CONDITIONS THERE.

A WIDE RANGE OF EXPERTS FROM ACROSS THE STATE WILL TALK ABOUT SOYBEAN MANAGEMENT FOR THAT ENVIRONMENT.

Ryan Buetow: AT THESE EVENTS WE'RE GOING TO HAVE MARKET UPDATES, FERTILITY UPDATES, RESEARCH BASED INFORMATION FROM DIFFERENT RESEARCH CENTERS ACROSS THE STATE AND IT'S REALLY WESTERN NORTH DAKOTA FOCUSED. THE MANAGEMENT IS GOING TO BE QUITE A BIT DIFFERENT FROM THE RED RIVER VALLEY. OUT HERE IN THE WEST WE HAVE A LOT LOWER YIELD POTENTIAL, AND WITH THAT COMES DIFFERENT MANAGEMENT.

THE SEMINARS WILL BE HELD AT THE KMOT AG SHOW IN MINOT, NORTH DAKOTA ON JANUARY 26TH AND IN DICKINSON ON FEBRUARY 7TH. TOPICS INCLUDE NITROGEN FIXATION, SOIL, WEED, AND INSECT MANAGEMENT AND STORAGE. ALL THE INFORMATION IS ON YOUR SCREEN.

THE EVENT DEBUTED LAST YEAR, BUT IT WAS HELD VIRTUALLY DUE TO THE PANDEMIC.

THANKS, ROSE.

TRADE AND CLIMATE-SMART AGRICULTURE ARE KEYS TO KEEPING FARMERS PROFITABLE FOR THE FUTURE. AGWEEK TV'S JEFF BEACH JOINS US NOW WITH HOW USDA IS LEADING EFFORTS IN THESE AREAS.

MICHELLE, AG SECRETARY TOM VILSACK ANNOUNCED CHINA TRADE ENFORCEMENT AND NEW CLIMATE-SMART AG PROGRAMS,

AT THE AMERICAN FARM BUREAU CONVENTION IN ATLANTA THIS WEEK.

VILSACK SAYS DESPITE THE RECENT EXPIRATION OF AG PURCHASE COMMITMENTS UNDER THE PHASE ONE AGREEMENT, THE U.S. CONTINUES TO PUSH CHINA TO MEET THEIR REMAINING OBLIGATIONS.

Tom Vilsack: Our Chinese friends are about $16 billion light over what they committed to purchase and that's why Ambassador Tai, our U.S. Trade Representative, is going to China and continues to converse with China about the necessity of living up totally and completely to the Phase One trade agreement.

VILSACK ALSO ANNOUNCED USDA IS INVESTING 50-MILLION DOLLARS IN 118 PARTNERSHIPS TO EXPAND CONSERVATION OPPORTUNITIES FOR CLIMATE-SMART AG, TO PROVIDE A NEW REVENUE STREAM FOR FARMERS.

Vilsack: And through pilots and demonstration projects we can encourage farmers to come together, establish climate smart practices, establish those climate smart commodities and do it in a way that makes sense on the ground.

USDA IS ALSO OFFERING 38-MILLION DOLLARS IN 11 STATES TO MITIGATE CLIMATE CHANGE WITH COVER CROPS.

THEY'RE PARTNERING WITH OTHER FARM AND CONSERVATION GROUPS WITH A GOAL OF DOUBLING ACREAGE BY 2030.

BUYING OR SELLING A FARM CAN BE CHALLENGING, BUT THERE ARE SOME GROUPS THAT CAN HELP. THE STORY'S AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV.

FARM RETIREMENT AND TRANSITIONS CAN BE CHALLENGING. BUT WE MET A SOUTHEASTERN MINNESOTA FARMER WHO IS MAKING IT EASIER FOR A YOUNG FAMILY TO OWN THEIR OWN FARM.

Lynne Reeck: I REALIZED PROBABLY IN 2018 THAT I JUST WASN'T GOING TO BE ABLE TO SUSTAIN IT MUCH LONGER.

LYNNE REECK HAS OWNED THE 25-ACRE SINGING HILLS DAIRY IN NERSTRAND, MINNESOTA FOR TWENTY FIVE YEARS. SHE RAISED GOATS AND MADE CHEESE, BUT IT WAS BECOMING TOO MUCH FOR HER TO MAINTAIN. SEVERAL ATTEMPTS TO SELL THE FARM FELL THROUGH, BUT IT WAS IMPORTANT TO REECK THAT IT CONTINUE AS A FARM, RATHER THAN BE SOLD TO DEVELOPERS.

Lynne Reeck: IT'S A BEAUTIFUL, SMALL FARM. I MEAN, IT'S PERFECT FOR PASTURE ANIMALS, THERE'S SOME LAND THAT'S NICE AND FLAT OUT THERE THAT WAS CROPPED BEFORE.

BUT LAND IS EXPENSIVE, MAKING IT HARD FOR YOUNG FARMERS TO GET STARTED THAT'S WHEN REECK GOT SOME HELP FROM A GROUP CALLED 'RENEWING THE COUNTRYSIDE'. THE GROUP AIMS TO HELP FARMERS STAY ON THE LAND. ALONG WITH HELP FROM MONEY RAISED BY THE AMERICAN FARMLAND TRUST, REECK'S LAND IS BEING TRANSITIONED TO THE LOR FAMILY, WHO HAVE BEEN RENTING LAND FOR YEARS.

Marlene Petersen: IN FARMING THERE ARE ALWAYS BARRIERS, AND SOMETIMES, YOU KNOW, THERE ARE MORE, ESPECIALLY AS WE KNOW FOR BEGINNING FARMERS AND EMERGING FARMERS AND FARMERS OF COLOR, OFTEN FOR FEMALE FARMERS.

THANKS TO A MODEL LIKE THIS, A NEW OWNER HAS A CHANCE TO PURSUE THEIR DREAM OF OWNING A FARM.

Lynne Reeck: I THINK, AND HOPE, THIS PLACE IS GOING TO BE A BLESSING.

IN THE LAST FIVE YEARS, MINNESOTA HAS LOST 34-HUNDRED FARMS, MUCH OF THAT LAND BEING SOLD FOR URBAN DEVELOPMENT.

STORIES YOU'LL ONLY SEE ON AGWEEK.COM AND AGWEEK MAGAZINE THIS WEEK.

TALC USA, A MULTIMILLION DOLLAR, SMALL TOWN NORTH DAKOTA AG PRODUCT COMPANY, HAS BEEN ACQUIRED BY BRANDT INC, AN ILLINOIS AG RETAILER.

AND WE PROFILE A FAMILY WHO DECIDED TO MOVE THEIR CALVING START DATE FROM EARLY SPRING TO EARLY WINTER, AND THE EFFECTS THAT IT'S HAD.

THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM , YOU CAN ALSO FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.

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