ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

AgweekTV Full Show: Fall cattle run, corn harvest, sugarbeet harvest impact and a tough year for apples

AgweekTV for Oct. 23-24, 2021.

Coming up on AgweekTV, we will discuss how this year's drought changes the fall cattle run in our region. We'll see corn harvest being well ahead of average in the western corn belt. We'll visit local businesses in the Red River Valley that go above and beyond during sugarbeet harvest season. Finally, we'll make the trip to an apple orchard in Minnesota that diversified into a distillery.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV

THIS YEAR'S DROUGHT CHANGES THE FALL CATTLE RUN IN OUR REGION.

CORN HARVEST IS WELL AHEAD OF AVERAGE IN THE WESTERN CORN BELT.

Emily Beal: we'll visit local businesses in the Red River Valley that keep their midnight oil burning in the sugarbeet harvest season.

ADVERTISEMENT

AND A MINNESOTA APPLE ORCHARD DIVERSIFIES INTO A DISTILLERY TO PROVIDE ANOTHER REVENUE STREAM.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I'M MICHELLE ROOK.

THE BIDEN ADMINISTRATION IS ADDRESSING THE SUPPLY CHAIN DISRUPTIONS HURTING AGRICULTURE AND THE U.S. ECONOMY.

PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN ANNOUNCED THE PORT OF LOS ANGELES WILL OPERATE 24 HOURS PER DAY, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK. THAT FOLLOWS A SIMILAR COMMITMENT BY THE PORT OF LONG BEACH A FEW WEEKS AGO.

USDA IS FOCUSED ON GETTING MORE PEOPLE AND WORK DONE AT THE PORTS AND IS EVALUATING HOW TO BEST USE RESOURCES RECENTLY ANNOUNCED TO PROVIDE ASSISTANCE.

THE BIDEN ADMINISTRATION IS ALSO STARTING TO ANNOUNCE STATE USDA APPOINTMENTS. THAT FOLLOWS THE CONFIRMATION OF A NEW UNDERSECRETARY OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT.

NEW MEXICO REPRESENTATIVE XOCHITL TORRES SMALL TOLD AGRI-PULSE, HER PRIORITIES INCLUDE REVITALIZING RURAL ECONOMIES BY IMPLEMENTING PRESIDENT BIDEN'S PLANS UNDER BUILD BACK BETTER. THAT INCLUDES SUPPORTING THEM ON THE FRONT LINE OF CLIMATE CHANGE.

By building disaster resiliancy, whether it's fire forest fires or droughts or floods, while also making climate smart investments like increasing access to renewable energy and fuel infrastructure and then creating new income opportunities in those markets.

ADVERTISEMENT

TO HELP ADVANCE THAT AGENDA, SHE SAYS MORE STATE R-D ANNOUNCEMENTS WILL SOON BE MADE.

So we've been working hard to identify the right people to do that work. Rural development is a large portfolio and finding people who have experience in all of those sectors is crucial.

THEY'LL ALSO WORK ON RURAL BROADBAND, HOSPITAL SERVICES AND AFFORDABLE HOUSING.

SOME FARM GROUPS ARE CONCERNED ABOUT FEDERAL COVID-19 VACCINE MANDATES FOR ELECTED FARM SERVICE AGENCY COUNTY ADVISORY COMMITTEES AND OTHERS.

ALL FEDERAL EMPLOYEES, INCLUDING STATE AND COUNTY COMMITTEE MEMBERS AND ADVISERS MUST BE VACCINATED BY NOVEMBER 22ND.

U.S. AG SECRETARY TOM VILSACK SAYS THE MANDATE WAS NEEDED FOR PUBLIC HEALTH.

SOME NORTH DAKOTA FARM GROUPS HAVE EXPRESSED CONCERNS ABOUT HOW THAT COULD AFFECT SERVICE AT FSA OFFICES FOR THOSE WHO CHOOSE TO QUIT RATHER THAN COMPLY. HOWEVER, VILSACK SAYS HE DOESN'T THINK IT WILL RESULT IN CLOSURES OR SERVICE REDUCTIONS FOR FARMERS.

THE FALL CATTLE RUN IS UNDERWAY WITH HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF CALVES AND YEARLINGS COMING TO MARKET. HOWEVER, WITH THIS YEAR'S DROUGHT, ALOT OF PRODUCERS LIQUIDATED COWS AND SOLD CALVES EARLY, WHICH WILL HAVE AN IMPACT ON THE MARKET PATTERN AND PRICES.

ADVERTISEMENT

It was a tough summer for the region's cattle producers in the region as the drought and lack of grass and water, forced culling decisions and made for a busy summer for auction markets.

Kent Fjeldheim: A lot of people split cows and kept the calves. Sold the cows. I would say we probably sold 30, 35,000 yearlings in you know, June, July and August.

That was a common trend among many sale barns and is changing the normal marketing pattern this fall.

Hellwig: It did get interrupted. We moved a lot of them early,and had a little break in the middle and now we're back at it. But no doubt, make no mistake, the yearlings are about done.

That liquidation would have continued if it hadn't been for rains that came just in time to green up the pastures.

Kent: You know we had a lot of people here talking about selling calves and cows you know in September right and we haven't sold any yet so this rain has made a huge difference."

However, the tighter supplies have led to a fairly strong market for calves and especially yearlings.

Kent: A lot of these yearlings are bring $1400, $1500. I mean that's nothing to sneeze at. I mean more would be better but the next guy buying them you know he seems to come up a little short all the time.

And with yearlings sold early that may result in a marketing opportunity at the end of the first quarter.

Hellwig: I still believe there will be a little hole here March and April, there's no question the calves are lighter coming off the cow because of the drought. The yearlings will be cleaned up a little earlier.

And, he's even more optimistic about the market longer term.

Hellwig: We liquidated a lot of cows, North Dakota we sold a lot of pairs this summer, we sold weigh-ups all summer long. I just, I think we're a year away from it really getting good.

FOR THE FIRST TIME, MEXICO'S REGULATORY AGENCY HAS DECLINED TO AUTHORIZE A BIOTECH CORN TRAIT.

MEXICO REJECTED BAYER'S NEW STACKED CORN WITH HT3 AND SMARTSTAX PRO TECHNOLOGY. IT'S THE LATEST MOVE IN THEIR OPPOSITION TO GM TECHNOLOGY AND GLYPHOSATE USE.

LAST WEEK MEXICO'S SUPREME COURT ALSO UNANIMOUSLY DENIED FOUR APPEALS FROM MAJOR SEED COMPANIES, FILED AGAINST THE BAN OF GMO CORN PLANTING AND THE USE OF GLYPHOSATE.

THE COUNTRY IS SET TO BAN GMO CORN IMPORTS BY JANUARY 2024.

THIS WEEK'S CROP STOP TAKES US TO WEST CENTRAL MINNESOTA, WHERE CORN HARVEST IS AHEAD OF SCHEDULE LIKE THE REST OF THE STATE AND REGION.

JOHN NORD GROWS CORN AND SOYBEANS ON ABOUT 25-HUNDRED ACRES NEAR HAWLEY.

HE FINISHED HARVESTING SOYBEANS ON OCTOBER 8TH, THEN STARTED CORN ON THE 10TH. HE SAYS MOISTURE LEVELS ARE RUNNING ABOUT FIFTEEN PERCENT AND THE TEST WEIGHT IS DECENT AT 56 POUNDS. HE SAYS HIS YIELDS DEPEND ON THE HYBRID AND PRECIP LEVELS.

OVERALL, MINNESOTA CORN HARVEST IS AT 53-PERCENT COMPLETE, WELL AHEAD OF THE 27 PERCENT AVERAGE.

A LAKE PARK, MINNESOTA FARMER HAS AGREED TO PLEAD GUILTY TO ONE COUNT OF CROP INSURANCE FRAUD.

KEVAN NELSON WAS CHARGED IN SEPTEMBER AFTER ALLEGEDLY REPORTING FALSE LOSS INFORMATION TO THE FEDERAL CROP INSURANCE CORPORATION IN 2018 AND 2019 TO GET CROP INSURANCE PAYMENTS TOTALING NEARLY 550-THOUSAND DOLLARS. THE CRIME IS PUNISHABLE BY A ONE MILLION DOLLAR FIND AND 30 YEARS IN PRISON.

A NORTH DAKOTA CATTLE CATTLE BUYER MUST REPAY A SALE BARN, TO AVOID CRIMINAL BAD CHECK CHARGES.

BRIAN WAYNE GADER DECADES AGO WAS A PARTNER IN NAPOLEON LIVESTOCK WHERE HE STILL ATTENDS WEEKLY SALES. HE LOST HIS STATE LICENSE TO DEAL CATTLE LAST MARCH.

HE'S ACCUSED OF BOUNCING A CHECK FOR TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-SEVEN THOUSAND DOLLARS TO THE LAKE REGION LIVESTOCK SALE BARN IN DEVILS LAKE, IN DECEMBER OF 2020.

A JUDGE HAS AGREED TO PAUSE THE CRIMINAL BAD CHECK CHARGES FOR UP TO A YEAR IF GADER REPAYS THE MONEY.

MEANWHILE, GADER HAS BEEN EMBROILED IN CIVIL CASES AROUND THE REGION, INVOLVING LOANS THAT LAST MAY TOTALED $7.7 MILLION.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV, WE'LL SEE HOW BUSINESSES IN SUGARBEET COUNTRY RAMP UP TO SUPPORT THE HARVEST.

THE SUGARBEET HARVEST IS UNDERWAY. IT'S AN INTENSE TIME FOR GROWERS, THEIR EMPLOYEES, AND THE BUSINESSES THAT SUPPORT THEM.

EMILY BEAL TALKED TO SOME WHO GO OUT OF THEIR WAY TO HELP GROWERS, IN THIS WEEK'S AGWEEK COVER STORY.

Christian Kiel: I KNOW HOW IMPORTANT IT IS TO KEEP THESE MACHINES RUNNING AND KEEP EVERYbody MOVING ALONG AND GET THE HARVEST DONE.

CHRISTIAN KIEL BUILDS AND REPAIRS BEET HARVESTER ROW-FINDERS. IT'S A FAMILY BUSINESS STARTED BY HIS GRANDFATHER IN THE 1950S. HE'S ALSO A BEET GROWER, SO HE UNDERSTANDS THE PRESSURES OF THE HARVEST. IT ROLLS AROUND THE CLOCK UNTIL ALL THE BEETS ARE OUT.

Christian Kiel: IT'S AMAZING. WE'RE A BIG FAMILY AND WE ALL, UP AND DOWN THE VALLEY WE ALWAYS TAKE CARE OF EACH OTHER. I JUST PRAY THAT EVERYBODY STAYS SAFE AND GOES HOME AT THE END OF THE DAY WHEN WE GET DONE WITH HARVEST.

NORMAN COUNTY IMPLEMENT OF ADA, MINNESOTA RUNS TWO CREWS AROUND THE CLOCK DURING HARVEST, TO BE READY FOR BREAKDOWNS ANYTIME.

Chuck Kroshus: THEY NEVER HAPPEN ON SCHEDULE. THE NICE THING IS, THIS IS WHAT BUILDS TRUST WITH OUR CLIENTELE.

Roger Hanson: CONTINUALLY, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK AND I COULD SAY 24 HOURS BUT THEY DO CALL ME IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT IF THEY HAVE A BREAKDOWN, AND I GO OUT AND FIX IT. IT GETS KIND OF HECTIC.

EVEN THE SUBWAY RESTAURANT IN ADA STAYS OPEN AROUND THE CLOCK DURING THE SUGARBEET CAMPAIGN.

Mark Potucek: AGRICULTURE IS SO IMPORTANT FOR OUR BUSINESS. // THEY DO BUSINESS WITH ME ALL YEAR SO IT'S KIND OF A THANK YOU TO THEM TO GIVE BACK TO THEM FOR WHAT THEY GIVE ME ALL YEAR ROUND.

Roger Hanson: YOU KNOW, WE TRY TO KEEP EVERYBODY HAPPY. IT DOESN'T ALWAYS WORK, BUT WE TRY.

Emily Beal: IT'S CLEAR TO SEE THAT SOME LOCAL BUSINESSES ARE DEDICATED TO GOING THE EXTRA MILE DURING SUGARBEET HARVEST SEASON. WITH AGWEEK, I'M EMILY BEAL IN ADA, MINNESOTA.

YOU CAN READ MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM .

THE NATIONAL BIODIESEL BOARD WILL BE CHANGING ITS NAME EARLY NEXT YEAR TO CLEAN FUELS ALLIANCE AMERICA.

NBB GOVERNING BOARD MEMBER TIM OSTREM SAYS THE GROUP WILL STILL REPRESENT SOYBEAN OIL BASED BIODIESEL, BUT THE NEW NAME BETTER REFLECTS THE FUTURE OF THE INDUSTRY. HE SAYS AS THEY EXPAND MARKETS THEY ARE ALSO EVOLVING TO REPRESENT OTHER PRODUCTS LIKE RENEWABLE DIESEL.

Tim Ostrem: It can be used in the pipelines and it also has the same characteristics as diesel as far as its cloud point.

THE SOUTH DAKOTA FARMER SAYS ANOTHER MAJOR GROWTH AREA THE GROUP IS INVOLVED IN IS THE SUSTAINABLE AVIATION FUEL MARKET.

The aviation industry wants it. They want a renewable product, a sustainable product. So we're excited about that prospect too.

HE SAYS THEIR MISSION STAYS THE SAME AND THE NEW NAME WILL POSITION THE ORGANIZATION FOR GROWTH.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, WE'LL SEE HOW PEOPLE FROM AROUND THE WORLD ARE HELPING TO STRENGTHEN NORTH DAKOTA..

AND LATER, WE'LL SEE WHAT CRISTEN CLARK IS COOKING UP WITH HER FRESH GARDEN PRODUCE.

HARVEST IS AHEAD OF THE FIVE YEAR AVERAGES IN THE REGION WITH MOSTLY COOPERATIVE WEATHER, BUT WE'VE YET TO HAVE A HARD KILLING FROST IN MANY AREAS. WILL THAT CHANGE ANYTIME SOON?

HERE'S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

NORTH DAKOTA'S RURAL COMMUNITIES OFFER LOTS OF OPPORTUNITIES , AND ONE WAY TO GROW IS BY ATTRACTING MORE PEOPLE FROM OTHER STATES, OR COUNTRIES.

WE'RE PARTNERING WITH A NON-PROFIT, STRENGTHEN ND, FOR THIS SPONSORED CONTENT SERIES.

ROSE DUNN TALKED WITH A DICKINSON MAN WHO'S AT HOME, VERY FAR FROM HIS HOMELAND IN AFRICA.

Barnabas Nyaaba: I'M JUST CURIOUS AND WANTED TO TRAVEL A LOT, EVEN WHEN I WAS IN COLLEGE, AND EVENTUALLY THAT LED ME HERE.

AFTER FINISHING COLLEGE IN GHANA, BARNABAS NYAABA WANTED TO SEE THE WORLD. HE VISITED SEVERAL COUNTRIES, INCLUDING THE U.S. FIVE YEARS AGO HE HAD THE CHANCE TO RETURN TO THE STATES, WHEN HE GOT A GREEN CARD ON A LOTTERY SYSTEM.

Barnabas Nyaaba: THE ONLY FRIEND I HAD WAS HERE IN DICKINSON, NORTH DAKOTA AND SO I THOUGHT WELL WHY NOT COME HERE AND YOU KNOW WITH THE ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES THEN THERE WAS THE OIL BOOM AND IT WAS REALLY GOOD. HE TOLD ME IT WAS EASIER TO GET A JOB HERE IN NORTH DAKOTA AND I SAID YEAH, I'M COMING UP HERE.

BARNABAS'S FAMILY FARMS IN GHANA, SO NORTH DAKOTA FEELS LIKE HOME TO HIM. HE WORKS REMOTELY FOR THE FARGO OFFICE OF WEX. AND HE'S BECOME INVOLVED IN COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES LIKE COACHING SOCCER.

Barnabas Nyaaba: THAT SMALL COMMUNITY FEEL, FAMILIAR FACES, YOU SEE THEM, YOU MIGHT GO TO WALMART AND YOU DEFINTELY WOULD MEET SOMEONE THAT YOU KNOW. AND THAT COMMUNITY I LIKE ABOUT IT.

Mark Billings: IT IS A SYMBOL OF THE MANY AFRICAN COUNTRIES THAT WE HAVE REPRESENTED HERE.

BARNABUS MET MARK BILLINGS THROUGH A PROJECT FUNDED BY "THE CHANGE NETWORK" TO CREATE THIS MURAL IN DOWNTOWN DICKINSON.

Mark Billings: WE WANTED TO CREATE CONNECTION POINTS, AND WE WANTED THE COMMUNITY HERE TO KNOW THE HARDWORKING NATURE OF THE IMMIGRANT COMMUNITY, AND JUST HOW UNIQUE THEY ARE.

BILLINGS CAME TO DICKINSON FROM ILLINOIS SEVEN YEARS AGO. SO HE UNDERSTANDS HOW HARD IT CAN BE TO FEEL AT HOME IN A NEW PLACE, AND HE ENJOYS HELPING NEWCOMERS, ESPECIALLY IMMIGRANTS, FIND OPPORTUNITIES IN THEIR NEW COMMUNITIES.

Mark Billings: YOU KNOW, THEY HAVE HAD TO FORGE THROUGH MANY THINGS THAT WE TAKE FOR GRANTED. I MOVED HERE I HAD A CAR, I HAD AN APARTMENT AND I HAD CERTAIN THINGS THAT I KNEW WERE GOING TO BE HERE, BUT IN THEIR WORLD THEY DON'T HAVE THAT. AND IT'S A HUMBLING EXPERIENCE TO ME, THESE INDIVIDUALS.

Barnabas Nyaaba: AND I BELIEVE THAT IF YOU'RE WILLING TO, YOU KNOW, TO LEARN AND TO WORK THERE ARE OPPORTUNITIES THAT YOU CAN TAKE ADVANTAGE OF.

IN DICKINSON, NORTH DAKOTA, THIS IS ROSE DUNN FOR AGWEEK.>

TO LEARN HOW STRENGTHEN ND HELPS BUILD BIG OPPORTUNITIES IN SMALL COMMUNITIES, VISIT STRENGTHEN ND.COM .

STILL AHEAD, AN APPLE A DAY MAY KEEP THE DOCTOR AWAY, BUT A MINNESOTA ORCHARD WILL ALSO LIFT SPIRITS.

ORCHARDS ARE A POPULAR PLACE THIS TIME OF YEAR, BUT ONE COUPLE IN SOUTHEAST MINNESOTA DISCOVERED THEY COULDN'T SURVIVE ON APPLES ALONE. SO THEY DECIDED TO EXPAND THEIR BUSINESS TO INCLUDE A DISTILLERY.

NOAH FISH VISITED MINNESOTA'S ONLY FARM DISTILLER.

Tammy Soma Clark: AND TO MAKE SPIRITS OUT OF APPLES IS UNIQUE.

TAMMY SOMA CLARK'S HUSBAND JAY BOUGHT THIS LAND IN THE EARLY NINETIES, AND WENT TO WORK DEVELOPING HIS FIRST-EVER ORCHARD. THEY PLANTED THE FIRST TREES ELEVEN YEARS AGO.

Jay Clark: AND IT WAS ALL WOODED, IT HAD BEEN TOTALLY OVERGROWN. IT'S JUST BEEN AN ONGOING PIECE OF WORK. DIDN'T KNOW A LOT ABOUT IT, PLANTED THEM THE WRONG DIRECTION THEY'RE SUPPOSED TO BE NORTH SOUTH, I PLANTED THEM EAST WEST, YOU KNOW. JUST ALL, WRONG ROOT STOCK, TOO BIG OF ROOT STOCK, YOU KNOW. THEN I SMARTENED UP A LITTLE BIT.

THEY NOW HAVE OVER 12 THOUSAND TREES, MOSTLY MINNESOTA'S OWN HONEYCRISP, AND A PRIVATE LABEL VARIETY THAT'S A HONEYCRISP MIX.

Jay Clark: BELIEVE IT OR NOT, HONEYCRISP TASTES BETTER THAN THEY DO ANY OTHER PART OF THE COUNTRY.

BUT THEY DISCOVERED THE BUSINESS COULDN'T MAKE IT ON APPLES. SO THEY CAME UP WITH THE IDEA FOR A DISTILLERY.

Tammy Soma Clark: OH I'D NEVER MAKE IT ON THE APPLES ALONE. NO, IT'S DEFINITELY THE ALCOHOL HAS CHANGED THE COURSE OF OUR BUSINESS.

TAMMY GOT HER STATE DISTILLERS LICENSE IN 2018, A YEAR AFTER GETTING HER FEDERAL ONE. THEN STARTED DISTILLING SPIRITS ON SITE

Tammy Soma Clark: NOW WE CAN TAKE ADVANTAGE OF ALL OF OUR PRODUCTS, WASTE, JUICE, EVERYTHING, AND TURN IT INTO SOMETHING. EVEN THE PULP LEFT OVER AFTER JUICING FOR FERMENTING OR CIDER GOES TO THE NEIGHBORS TO FEED THE COWS, SO IT'S REALLY AN ALL-AROUND NO WASTE OPERATION.

IN THE NEXT FEW YEARS THEY WILL BE RELEASING APPLE BRANDY AND AGED RUM. IN ROCHESTER, MINNESOTA, THIS IS NOAH FISH FOR AGWEEK.

MANY GARDENS HAVE BEEN OVERFLOWING WITH TOMATOES AND PEPPERS, AND CRISTEN CLARK HAS A RECIPE FOR PRESERVING THAT TASTE OF SUMMER.

CLARK IS THE IOWA FARMER WHO WRITES THE "FOOD AND SWINE" BLOG, A MONTHLY AGWEEK MAGAZINE COLUMN, AND SHARES VIDEOS ON AGWEEK.COM . \u0009\u0009THIS WEEK, SHE SHARES HER FAVORITE, EASY RECIPE FOR SALSA, WITH TOMATOES AND PEPPERS FRESH FROM THE GARDEN. GO TO AGWEEK.COM TO CHECK IT OUT.

THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK'S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM , OR YOU CAN FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.

What To Read Next