Slow harvest pace

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Fall rains can be both a joy and a frustration for Upper Midwest farmers — the former if soil moisture needs recharging, the latter if crops still need to be harvested.

Though recent rains in parts of Agweek country have improved the 2018 crop outlook, they've also slowed the overall harvest pace.

The new weekly crop progress report, released Monday, Sept. 25 by the National Agricultural Statistics Service, an arm of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, shows that the region's corn, soybean and sugar beet harvests lag their respective five-year averages.

The report reflects conditions on Sept. 24.

Corn

North Dakota — One percent of the crop was harvested, compared with the five-year average of 6 percent. Fifty-three percent was rated good or excellent, 31 percent fair and 16 percent poor or very poor.

South Dakota — One percent was harvested, compared with the five-year average of 11 percent. Forty percent was rated good or excellent, 33 percent fair and 27 percent poor or very poor.

Minnesota — One percent was harvested, compared with the five-year average of 8 percent. Eighty-one percent was in good or excellent shape, 15 percent fair and 4 percent poor or very poor.

Soybeans

South Dakota — Four percent of beans were harvested, compared with the five-year average of 17 percent. Forty-nine percent were rated good or excellent, 34 percent fair and 17 percent poor or very poor.

Minnesota — Seven percent was harvested, compared with the five-year average of 19 percent. Seventy-one percent was rated good or excellent, 22 percent fair and 7 percent poor or very poor.

North Dakota — Nine percent was harvested, compared with the five-year average of 21 percent. Fifty-two percent was in good or excellent condition, 33 percent fair and 15 percent poor or very poor.

Sugar beets

North Dakota — Twelve percent was harvested, compared with the five-year average of 13 percent.

Minnesota — Ten percent was harvested, compared with the five-year average of 12 percent.