Weather Forecast

Close

News

Halfway through harvest

Every fall, typically in late August or early September, there's a point at which Upper Midwest farmers' harvest reaches the half-finished stage. Though they may not have harvested half their total acreage, they're wrapping up small grains and haven't started in earnest yet on row crops.

The region is nearing that halfway-through-harvest point now, according to the latest weekly crop progress report issued Sept. 5 by the National Agricultural Statistics Service, an arm of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The small-grains harvest was on the home stretch as of Sept. 4, according to the report.

In North Dakota, 90 percent of spring wheat was harvested, compared with the five-year average of 74 percent.

South Dakota farmers have harvested 93 percent of their spring wheat, the same as their five-year average.

In Montana, 85 percent of spring wheat was harvested, compared with the five-year average of 66 percent.

Minnesota farmers have harvested 97 percent of their spring wheat, compared with the five-year average of 84 percent.

Harvest of both oats and barley across the region also is ahead of its five-year average. That reflects widespread drought this year, which accelerated harvest, and generally good planting conditions this spring, which allowed many farmers to plant earlier this spring than they had in some recent years.

The start of corn and soybean harvest is coming closer, according to numbers in the report.

Corn

South Dakota — Eight percent was mature, compared with the five-year average of 9 percent. Forty-two percent was rated good or excellent, 32 percent fair and 26 percent poor or very poor.

Minnesota — Six percent was mature, the same as the five-year average. Eighty-one percent was rated good or excellent, 15 fair and 4 percent poor or very poor. Minnesota farmers generally have avoided the drought that's hammering many of their peers in North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana.

North Dakota — Seven percent was mature, compared with the five-year average of 8 percent. Forty-eight percent was rated good or excellent, 32 percent fair and 20 percent poor or very poor.

Soybeans

Minnesota — Five percent was dropping leaves, compared with the five-year average of 9 percent. Seventy-three percent was in in good or excellent condition, 21 percent fair and 7 percent poor or very poor.

North Dakota — Twenty-seven percent was dropping leaves, compared with the five-year average of 29 percent. Forty-seven percent was rated good or excellent, 34 percent poor and 19 percent poor or very poor.

South Dakota — Twenty-four percent was dropping leaves, compared with the five-year average of 26 percent. Forty-eight percent was rated good or excellent, 33 percent fair and 19 percent poor or very poor.

Advertisement
randomness