Weather Forecast

Close

News

Soybeans in Jamestown, N.D., are holding up so far against hot, dry conditions. Crop conditions continue to decline across North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana due to drought. Photo taken July 17, 2017. (Jenny Schlecht/Agweek)

More drought decline: Report shows further crop deterioration

Upper Midwest crops continue to go downhill, a new government report says.

The weekly crop progress report, reflecting conditions on July 16, was released Monday, July 17, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service, an arm of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The report found, as expected, that drought's already-major impact on most crops in the region is growing, in some cases rapidly.

Corn reflects the ongoing downturn.

In South Dakota, 38 percent of corn was rated poor or very poor. That compares with 28 percent a week earlier and and 22 percent two weeks earlier.

North Dakota corn was rated 24 percent poor or very poor, compared with 20 percent a week earlier and 16 percent two weeks earlier.

In Minnesota, 5 percent of corn was in poor or very shape, compared with 4 percent a week earlier and 3 percent two weeks earlier. Though Minnesota has largely avoided the worst of the regional drought, anecdotal reports suggest that inadequate moisture is an increasing concern in the state.

Range and pasture conditions are deteriorating, too.

In North Dakota, 74 percent of range and pasture was rated poor or very poor, compared with 69 percent a week earlier and and 62 percent two weeks earlier.

In South Dakota, 68 percent of range and pasture was in poor or very poor shape, compared with 59 percent a week earlier and 57 percent two weeks earlier.

Montana range and pasture was rated 58 percent poor or very poor, compared with 51 percent a week earlier and 42 percent two weeks earlier.

In Minnesota, 6 percent of range and pasture was rated poor or very poor, unchanged from each of the previous two weeks.

Conditions of other crops raised in the Upper Midwest, including barley and sorghum, declined overall in the past week, too.

Here's what the report found for spring wheat and soybeans, which, along with corn, are the region's three main crops.

Spring wheat

South Dakota — Seventy-four percent was in poor or very poor shape, compared with 72 percent a week earlier and 65 percent two weeks earlier.

Montana — Sixty-one percent was rated poor or very poor, slightly better than the 62 percent a week earlier but substantially worse than the 51 percent two weeks earlier.

North Dakota — Forty percent was in poor or very poor shape, compared with 35 percent a week earlier and and 30 percent two weeks earlier.

Minnesota — Two percent was rated poor or very poor, compared with 1 percent in each of the previous two weeks. The state's spring wheat production is concentrated in northwest Minnesota, which generally has held up relatively well on moisture.

Soybeans

South Dakota — Thirty-three percent was in poor or very poor condition, compared with 28 percent a week earlier and 23 percent two weeks earlier.

North Dakota — Twenty-five percent was rated poor or very poor, compared with 19 percent earlier and 17 percent two weeks earlier.

Minnesota — Six percent was in poor or very poor shape, compared with 5 percent in each of the previous two weeks.

Advertisement
randomness