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Published July 11, 2011, 12:00 AM

Permazyme


Bob Johnson, a senior adviser/road specialist and salesman for Pacific Enzymes Inc. of Sacramento, Calif., packs a spot on the Melvin farm south of Buffalo, N.D., to prepare for a demonstration with government officials on how the company’s system can stabilize roads softened by excessive water. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)

  • Bob Johnson, a senior adviser/road specialist and salesman for Pacific Enzymes Inc. of Sacramento, Calif., packs a spot on the Melvin farm south of Buffalo, N.D., to prepare for a demonstration with government officials on how the company’s system can stabilize roads softened by excessive water. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • Once properly treated and packed, road beds with the proper minimum level of clay content become as hard as concrete. A treated roadbed will resist water and stand up to considerable punishment, says Bob Johnson, who sells Permazyme. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • Bob Johnson of Pacific Enzymes Inc. is from Chico, Calif., and travels countrywide to sell enzymes that his company promotes to stabilize rural roads that have been losing their strength with higher water tables. One key to the process is proper packing, he says. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • Pacific Enzymes Inc. has worked with the Asphalt Zipper company on a machine modification for enzyme application. Here, Bob Johnson, one of the company’s road specialists, points to the application bar that adds an enzyme mixture that the company says will work to grind up and replace asphalt and bind it for a surface similar to a gravel road. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)