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Published July 02, 2011, 12:00 AM

Drain tile


Max Fuxa (left) and Dustin Lundeby, with Ellingson Cos. at the Harwood, N.D., location, say interest in tile drainage is high and a new state law should make it easier to get tiling permits. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)

  • Max Fuxa (left) and Dustin Lundeby, with Ellingson Cos. at the Harwood, N.D., location, say interest in tile drainage is high and a new state law should make it easier to get tiling permits. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • Max Fuxa (left) and Dustin Lundeby, with Ellingson Cos. at the Harwood, N.D., location, say interest in tile drainage is high and a new state law should make it easier to get tiling permits. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • Some black, corrugated plastic tile is encased in a white “sock” in the sand, which is used to keep fine sand from getting into the tile. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • Work on tile drainage starts the lower end and is extended to higher areas of fields. This plan is for land near McLeod, N.D. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • An Ellingson Drainage crew gets a pull while using a tile plow in an extremely wet corner of a field in the McLeod, N.D., area on June 16. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • Drainage tile business has been heating up in the Red River Valley with the continuation of wetter growing seasons and higher land and commodity values. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • An Ellingson Drainage plow operator continually sees how the drainage tile depth matches the surface contour, as it is laid beneath the soil. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • Don Moffet of Barney, N.D., is chairman of the Richland County Water Resource Board. He says a new state law that eases field drainage tile permits was well-intentioned, but he wants it monitored to make sure all parties are protected. (Mikkel Pate / Agweek)
  • Some black, corrugated plastic tile is encased in a white “sock” in the sand, which is used to keep fine sand from getting into the tile. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)