Advertise in Print | Subscriptions
Published June 27, 2011, 12:00 AM

Bethany


Linda Grotberg describes herself as the “innovator” at Bethany Prairie Farm near Wimbledon, N.D. She and her husband, Dick Grotberg, and friend and partner, Dick Lovestrand, are active in sustainable ag. Here, she stands in a mix of grasses designed to improve soil health. In the background are the farmstead and steeple of a small church that was moved to the farmstead. (Jonathan Knutson / Agweek)

  • Linda Grotberg describes herself as the “innovator” at Bethany Prairie Farm near Wimbledon, N.D. She and her husband, Dick Grotberg, and friend and partner, Dick Lovestrand, are active in sustainable ag. Here, she stands in a mix of grasses designed to improve soil health. In the background are the farmstead and steeple of a small church that was moved to the farmstead. (Jonathan Knutson / Agweek)
  • Dick Grotberg, Linda Grotberg’s husband, was a conventional farmer for many years. Now, he’s involved in sustainable agriculture near Wimbledon, N.D. (Jonathan Knutson / Agweek)
  • Dick Lovestrand is a partner in Bethany Prairie Farm near Wimbledon, N.D. Besides his hands-on work at the farm, he’s also its “researcher” and investigates ways to improve and enhance the operation’s many components. (Jonathan Knutson / Agweek)
  • A rural schoolhouse was moved to Wimbledon, N.D.’s Bethany Prairie Farm years ago, and children were homeschooled in it. The building still is used, though not as a school. (Jonathan Knutson / Agweek)
  • Scottish Highland cattle are raised on Bethany Prairie Farm near Wimbledon, N.D. The operation uses a nine-year rotation to improve soil health. (Jonathan Knutson / Agweek)
  • Saanen goats, which Bethany Prairie Farm near Wimbledon, N.D., raises and sells, are known for producing large quantities of milk and being easy to keep. This goat was boat in the spring. (Jonathan Knutson / Agweek)