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Published June 06, 2011, 12:00 AM

Russia family


Alexander Bolobolov and his son, Denis, farm in the Krasnodar area. Bolobolov has cut the work force on the 8,000-acre farm and food companies from 1,200 in 1997 to 70 today, largely through switching to John Deere equipment from the Agro-Construction Technologies Co. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)

  • Alexander Bolobolov and his son, Denis, farm in the Krasnodar area. Bolobolov has cut the work force on the 8,000-acre farm and food companies from 1,200 in 1997 to 70 today, largely through switching to John Deere equipment from the Agro-Construction Technologies Co. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • The Bolobolov farm has decided to completely shift to western-style equipment — John Deere equipment, from Agro-Construction Technologies equipment, a subsidiary of RDO Equipment of Fargo, N.D. The equipment is making farms more efficient in the post-collective era. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • Alexander Bolobolov, 54, wears a ring that he says has been worn since 1820 by the head man at his farm. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • The Bolobolovs and their 70 employees run a farm and raise ducks in a free-range regimen. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • The Bolobolovs are paying more for John Deere equipment through Agro-Construction Technologies equipment, through an RDO Equipment subsidiary in Krasnodar, in southern Russia, but they say it is more efficient than Russian-built equipment. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • The Bolobolov farm has cut employees from 1,200 to 70 since 1997, using western-style farm equipment in growing everything from cereal grains, to poultry and baking-processing operations. The Bolobolovs are customers of Agro-Construction Technologies, a Russian subsidiary of RDO Equipment in Fargo, N.D. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • A large headquarters building for the Bolobolov farm in the village of Staromyshastovskaya, near Krasnodar, Russia, was built as a collective farm headquarters in 1973. The building has the feel of a remodeled school building from the 1920s high ceilings, to the wide staircases and dining room. The building is decorated with Soviet hammer and sickle, adopted by Russia in 1924, eventually representing unity of industrial and agricultural workers. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • Denis Bolobolov, 28, (left) a farmer from Staromyshastovskaya, near Krasnodar, Russia, is served by ACT salesman Andrey Mechkalo of the ACT’s Dinskaya store. Mechkalo graduated from an agrarian university in mechanical engineering.<br /><br />(Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • A tractor on the Boloboloy farm carries a logo (right) for the farm, and a prominent logo for retailer Agro-Construction Technologies (ACT), a Russian subsidiary of RDO Equipment of Fargo. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • The Bolobolovs are paying more for John Deere equipment through Agro-Construction Technologies (ACT) equipment, through an RDO Equipment subsidiary in Krasnodar, in southern Russia, but they say it is more efficient than Russian-built equipment. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • Alexander Bolobolov farms near Krasnodar on an 8,000-acre operation that includes several value-added elements. He says his time in the Soviet army and the discipline he learned is a key to his ability to run a farm that includes poultry and baking enterprises. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)