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Published November 02, 2010, 12:00 AM

Streeter


Range scientists Paul Nyren (right) and Guojie Wang study switch grass and other perennial crop mixes for their potential as biomass fuel production. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)

  • Range scientists Paul Nyren (right) and Guojie Wang study switch grass and other perennial crop mixes for their potential as biomass fuel production. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • Janet Patton, wife of Bob Patton and a seasonal technician,  clips brush, grass and forb plants in an enclosure on the Central Grasslands Research Center near Streeter, N.D. On the horizon is Lake George (also, “Salt Lake”)  an alkaline lake where the center cooperates with a separate, federal climate change study. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • Xuejun Dong, an eco-physiologist originally from China, has been with the Central Grassland Research Station eight years, and Bob Patton,  originally from Kansas, has been there about two decades. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • Range scientist Bob Patton uses a “sward stick” device to measure the height of plant material in a grazing study at the Central Grassland Research Station at Streeter, N.D. . The device measures how high the vegetation supports physically supports a  quarter-meter plate off the ground. A sward is a field of grass. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • Eco-physiologist Xuejun Dong uses a quarter-meter frame measuring frame to mark the spot where he collects samples of brush, grass and forb plants on a native prairie, in long-range grazing study by colleague Bob Patton at the Central Grassland Research and Extension Center near Streeter, N.D. One problem for the station is the lack of technicians to do the on-the-ground work, so researchers can spend more time in analysis. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • The Central Grassland Research and Extension Center at Streeter, N.D., is home to a collection of biomass test plots around the state. Station director Paul Nyren and colleagues are collecting data about production capacities of switch grass, wheat grasses, and mixes with perennial grasses, including big bluestem. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • Range scientists Paul Nyren (right) and Guojie Wang are studying switch grass and other perennial crop mixes for their potential as biomass fuel production. Plots are throughout central and western North Dakota. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • Paul Nyren (right),  director of North Dakota State University's Central Grassland Research and Extension Center at Streeter, N.D., says a Chinese science connection with staffers like range scientist Guojie Wang have been offered the center a cultural and knowledge boost. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • The Central Grassland Research and Extension Center coordinates a biomass study at several points in central and western North Dakota, using a small harvest machine to collect yield data. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • Jaime Toney,  a graduate student  of geology at Brown University in Rhode Island in February 2009 took core samples from the floor of Lake George (locally “Salt Lake”) near Streeter, N.D. The sediments contain proteins created by algae at certain temperatures. The Central Grassland Research and Extension Center helps with ongoing water temperature data collection for Toney’s federal study. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)
  • Jaime Toney,  a graduate student  of geology at Brown University in Rhode Island in February 2009 took core samples from the floor of Lake George (locally “Salt Lake”) near Streeter, N.D. The sediments contain proteins created by algae at certain temperatures. The Central Grassland Research and Extension Center helps with ongoing water temperature data collection for Toney’s federal study. (Mikkel Pates / Agweek)