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Growing Together: June yard and garden do's and don'ts

Growing Together: June yard and garden do's and don'ts

FARGO -- Lawn grass has grown so speedily from plentiful May and June moisture, it's easy to become a redneck gardener. What's a redneck gardener? It's a homeowner who needs to mow his lawn to find where he left his wheelbarrow. Besides mowing, June is a busy month around the yard and garden. Let's discuss timely do's and don'ts.

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Jessie Veeder: With this ring, we all become family

Jessie Veeder: With this ring, we all become family

WATFORD CITY, N.D. -- Well, wedding week at the ranch has come and gone. The relatives rolled in, the fences got painted and the ever-changing weather forecast had mercy on the couple hundred people who stood under a big, blue beautiful sky at the ranch in front of the red barn to celebrate love.

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Katie Pinke: Thank you, farmworkers

Katie Pinke: Thank you, farmworkers

Whether or not they share bloodlines, farmworkers are family to me. They are trusted friends who diligently contribute to one of the most noble and essential professions. Growing up, all those who worked on our family’s farm would gather around the dining room table for dinner at noon. The hired men sat amongst my family members.

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Order of food during a meal may influence blood sugar

Overweight and obese people with type 2 diabetes may feel better after a meal if they start it off with vegetables or proteins and end with the carbs, suggests a new study of 11 people.

Prairie Fare: Naturally recycle your kitchen wastes

"Julie, Julie, how does your garden grow?" people often ask me when inspired by my maiden name. Yes, that reminds me of the "Mary, Mary, quite contrary, how does your garden grow?" nursery rhyme. Fortunately, people leave out the "quite contrary" part. Well, they usually do.

Crop tours highlight Carrington Center Field Day

The North Dakota State University Carrington Research Extension Center (CREC) annual field day will be held Tuesday, July 14. "This is our premiere summer event to showcase the center's research program," says Greg Endres, Extension area agronomist at the center.

Growing Together: Hare today, gone tomorrow

Growing Together: Hare today, gone tomorrow

FARGO -- Do you know Elmer Fudd has chased Bugs Bunny around his garden for 75 years? Times have changed, and an elderly gentleman running through the neighborhood waving a shotgun is no longer appropriate behavior.

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Jessie Veeder: Busy roads but still slow Internet

Jessie Veeder: Busy roads but still slow Internet

I pulled my car over on the top of the hill at the approach next to the gate where there's usually a white pickup with a company logo idling and a man inside checking his phone or writing in a notebook. Usually, I see them there and shake my head in annoyance, wishing they would find another place to park, as if the county road going through the ranch belongs to us only. Because it seemed like it used to anyway.

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Katie Pinke: A dad he didn't have to be

Katie Pinke: A dad he didn't have to be

As we celebrate Father's Day, I’m mindful of those who struggle with the absence of a father in their lives. In our stoic, small-town manner, most say very little in order to appear strong. But silently, they ache for the dad who has passed away, the father who was never present, the dad who left never to be seen again, the dad who hurt them and never apologized or the father who shows up in good times but doesn't help in the hard times.

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Texas return of deep fryers to schools raises obesity concerns

DALLAS - A decision this week to return deep fryers and soda machines to Texas schools has raised criticism among nutrition experts who say it will worsen a childhood obesity problem in the second-most populous U.S. state.

Trans fats may hurt memory, too

Artificial trans fats in processed foods, which were all but banned by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) this week, may interfere with memory, according to a new study.

Growing Together: Enjoying the shady side of gardening

Growing Together: Enjoying the shady side of gardening

FARGO -- Do you live in a shady neighborhood, and aren't sure how to cope? No, I don't mean you're living next door to riff-raff, I mean you're puzzled knowing what to plant because trees or buildings are casting shade.

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Jessie Veeder: A kid of summer, again

Jessie Veeder: A kid of summer, again

WATFORD CITY, N.D. -- In small towns up and down the Midwest, summer has officially started. I know this not by the date on the calendar, but because in the next few months I'll run into kids catching and holding calves at the neighbor's branding down the road, rolling down the road in a tractor helping with harvest, or showing their steer at the county fair for a little extra cash.

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Katie Pinke: Why I don’t buy milk at a big-box store

Katie Pinke: Why I don’t buy milk at a big-box store

I’m the daughter of small business owners, I married into a family who owns a lumberyard and construction business, and I started my own speaking and consulting business a couple of years ago. I’m passionate about supporting small independent businesses. Add a small town into the equation, and you’ll find those businesses are the backbone of our communities.

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'Know your farmer' kicks off

Farmers markets are gearing up again this summer, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Know Your Farmer, Know your Food program, or KYF2, can help consumers and producers learn more them.

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