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Report: Family farms produce 80 percent of world’s food

Report: Family farms produce 80 percent of world’s food

Despite renewed interest in industrial agriculture by investment banks and sovereign wealth funds, more than 80 percent of the world’s food is still produced by family farmers, according to new U.N. research published Oct. 16.

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EPA approves Dow’s Enlist herbicide for GMO soy, corn

The Environmental Protection Agency gave final approval on Oct. 15 to a new herbicide developed by Dow AgroSciences that has faced broad opposition, ordering a series of restrictions to address potential environmental and health hazards.

Concern over food supplies for growing world population

With the world population rising, demographers are grappling with one of the most pressing issues of the century — will there be enough food for an extra 2 billion to 4 billion people?

WATCH: A sneak peek into the next issue of Agweek

WATCH: A sneak peek into the next issue of Agweek

Ag students are in high demand and have a good chance of landing a job right out of college. Agweek's Oct. 20 cover story will introduce one senior who has high hopes of working in the livestock industry. Experts also weigh in on the demand for ag grads. Join Editor Lisa Gibson for a sneak peek into the magazine, including coverage of the PED virus, ballot measure debates and more.

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Former Walhalla, ND, ethanol plant creates foundation for local entrepreneurs

Former Walhalla, ND, ethanol plant creates foundation for local entrepreneurs

The former ADM Corn Ethanol Plant, which laid off about 60 people — more than 5 percent of the Walhalla, N.D., workforce — when it closed in 2012, is slowly coming back to life.

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Minn. leaders seek federal rail help

Minnesota’s leaders want federal help to ease railroad delays. U.S. Sens. Amy Klobuchar and Al Franken and Gov. Mark Dayton sent a letter Monday to the head of the Surface Transportation Board, saying that rail delays are hurting many parts of the economy.

With cool weather, crops dry slowly

With cool weather, crops dry slowly

Producers in the region could be dealing with late-maturing, high-moisture corn this fall. That means they have some decisions to make, according to Ken Hellevang, North Dakota State University Extension Service agricultural engineer and professor in NDSU’s Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Department.

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Some beet growers close to finishing harvest

Some beet growers close to finishing harvest

FARGO, N.D. — Some of the region’s sugar beet farmers will be finished with harvest by the week of Oct. 13, if weather conditions continue to hold. It’s been one of the cleanest, quickest harvests in recent memory, according to beet co-op officials.

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Soybean yields vary greatly; ‘pumpkins’ a problem

Upper Midwest soybean farmers took full advantage of beautiful early October weather. “The harvest is really swinging into high gear,” says John Kringler, North Dakota State University extension agent in Cass County, traditionally the nation’s leading soybean producer.

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Conference tackles ag transport issues, new N.D. rules govern fertilizer content and N.D. woman acquitted in deaths of seven horses.

Northwood, ND, plant is crushing canola again

Northwood, ND, plant is crushing canola again

NORTHWOOD, N.D. — A crushing plant that reopened here this summer under new management is doing as well as can be expected and could be expanded, its general manager says.

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Whitewashing ag language for consumers

Farmers and ranchers have a well-deserved reputation for straight talk.

WASDE: Corn, soybeans up

Projected U.S. wheat ending stocks for 2014 to ’15 are down 44 million bushels. Production for 2014 to ’15 is up 5 million bushels based on the latest estimate from the Sept. 30 Small Grains 2014 Summary.

ND farmer adds to farm, feedlot through industry highs and lows

ND farmer adds to farm, feedlot through industry highs and lows

Chase Dewitz has fearlessly expanded his North Dakota farm, having ridden the ups and now navigating the downs of lower commodity prices.

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SD meetings discuss concerns about WOTUS

SD meetings discuss concerns about WOTUS

Farmers and ranchers gathered Oct. 8 in Chamberlain, S.D., to discuss the Environmental Protection Agency’s plans to change the definition of how waterways are governed in the U.S.

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