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Articles

Bighorn sheep population stays steady

Most everyone who hunts in North Dakota, whether they actually hunt deer or not, knows the opening day for deer gun season is Friday, Nov. 8.

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Game and Fish conduct various studies each year to assist wildlife

State Game and Fish Department biologists conduct a variety of studies every year. The familiar ones are those that provide counts or indexes that factor into season setting and limits, and also set hunter and angler expectations.

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Leier: Hunters make sure licenses are in hand

Last week, the state Game and Fish Department began its seasonal periodic reminders urging the thousands of deer hunters to take a few minutes to go find their 2013 deer license.

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Leier: Pheasant hunting season starts with hope

I often draw parallels between sports and the outdoors because it sometimes helps to look at situations from different perspectives.

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Leier: Preventing CWD in deer is a challenge

With all the archery deer hunting activity and the coming spike with deer gun season, it’s a good time to remind hunters of specific regulations on transporting deer and other big game.

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Leier: Ducks up, while deer, pheasants down

Many hunters these days are bemoaning a downward population trend for deer and pheasants in North Dakota. On the other hand, for 2013 at least, duck and goose populations are in good shape and can provide opportunities that hunters may not want to overlook.

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Leier: Aquatic nuisance species prevention in ND is great

For good reason, the State Game and Fish Department makes every effort to explain waterfowl hunting rules and regulations that hunters will need to know as they take the field this fall. This includes daily bag limits, species restrictions, season lengths, special zones and hunting hours.

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Leier: North Dakotans should take time to enjoy outdoors

For most of us, the road traveled matters little once we’ve arrived at our destination.

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Leier: ND ducks above long-term average

Hunters aren’t much different than sports fans when looking forward to upcoming seasons and learning about expert analysis and predictions. Fall flight forecasts for waterfowl and results from upland game brood surveys will pique the interest of hunters and wildlife managers alike.

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Leier: HIP helps identify, survey dove hunters

If you catch a conversation between hunters and hear a reference to HIP, chances are they are discussing the Harvest Information Program and not what their kids or teenage neighbors are into.

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Columns

Leier: The future of fishing

Recently, a friend asked me how I see fishing in the future. Since my approach to fishing probably fits more in 1983 than 2013, and for sure what fishing may be like in 2033, I really struggled to envision the way fishing would look years from now.

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Spring is all around

Signs of spring are all over these days. Spring turkey season is days and not weeks away. The turning of the calendar means you’ll need a new 2009 fishing license, and snow geese continue to roll through the state.

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Explaining the early Canada goose hunt

Non hunters and hunters who don’t target Canada geese may be taken off guard a bit when learning those hunters they’ve seen and heard are out taking part in the early Canada goose season in North Dakota—for good reason.

Thoughts already are turning to the fall

Here it is barely summer and a lot of us are already looking ahead to what the fall hunting season might provide. While some prospects are risky to try to pin down just yet, spring weather conditions can give us some ideas about how various species have fared so far.

A little planning, organization can make boat launches uneventful

As we wade a little deeper into summer, I often preview the Fourth of July holiday and summer vacations with a safety reminder for anyone spending time in, on and around our lakes, rivers and reservoirs. So I’ll reiterate the only guarantee for a memorable outdoor excursion is for all participants to return home safe.