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Don Kinzler


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Articles

Growing Together: Gardening tips for budding horticulturists

Long before I studied horticulture and was employed by North Dakota State University, I was a little boy who loved vegetable gardening and flowers.

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Fielding Questions: Small trees near Fargo Macy's misidentified

Q. I’ve got to ask myself a question. How could I misidentify the photograph that was sent to me of the small trees near the Fargo Macy’s?

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Fielding Questions: Program promotes gardening among kids

Q. I thought you might be interested in a new program we’ve started to promote gardening among our kids. I’ve enclosed information. – Nikki Johnson, Cass County Extension Service, Fargo

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Growing Together: Buyer beware of non-hardy plants

A recent visit to several local merchandisers selling trees, shrubs and plants called for expose-type reporting. My heart sinks when I see plants offered for sale that have little or no chance for success in our area.

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Plant more, spend less: Tips for a great garden that won't break the bank

Someday, I want my home’s yard to look like the gardens at Versailles Palace. The only problem is I’ve got an orchid taste on a petunia pocketbook.

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Hortiscope: Where to go for horticulture info

Readers: With my exit from the Hortiscope column and retirement, I have been asked by many how to get information on horticultural problems. The answer simply is to contact your local NDSU Extension agent. If the agent is not sufficiently schooled in horticulture to answer your questions, he or she will know where to turn to get the answer.

Hortiscope: A look at past letters sent to Hortiscope

Readers: I’ll do a little reminiscing on some articles and inquiries this week. Here is a question posed to Don Kinzler, who started Hortiscope in 1983.

Hortiscope: Plant expert to retire, will not write column

To everything, there is a beginning and an end. The Hortiscope column started in the early 1980s but will end its run at the end of December because that is when I’ll be retiring from the NDSU Extension Service.

Hortiscope: Cut your roses back in fall for best results

Q: I have several questions about different plants. I would like to know if I can trim a schefflera plant. I have a nice plant that was given to me for my son’s funeral. The plant sits in my enclosed sunroom by an east window. It is very big, so I’m wondering if I can cut some of it off.

Hortiscope: Trees that keep leaves into fall may be in trouble

Readers: One of my colleagues, Joe Zeleznik, NDSU Extension Service forester, had what I thought was an interesting question posed to him. His response is excellent and I think worthy of a read by anyone who ever has wondered the same thing about trees. Read on!

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Columns

Growing Together: Get to know your roses

Singer Lynn Anderson never promised you a rose garden, but I will. Anderson obviously didn’t have access to the right plant material.

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Growing Together: Imagining the Iris: Proper weeding key to thriving perennials

Good news: Gardening participation is up with a surprising new twist.

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Grab your favorite gardening gloves, get smarter while weeding

Garden dirt might make you smarter. Research by the American Society for Microbiology indicates that exposure to Microbacterium vacae is believed to increase learning behavior by stimulating the neurons in the brain. Luckily this bacterium occurs naturally in garden soil.

Growing Together: Keep it real: Artificial flowers on graves a disturbing trend

Every Memorial Day, I discuss death with my family.

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Creeping red fescue is very shade tolerant

Q: I am looking for some help. I have a spot in my lawn where grass won’t grow.