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Curtis Eriksmoen


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Articles

Did You Know That: ND man served shortest tenure as US senator

A man who served only 56 days in the U.S. Senate statistically holds more North Dakota senatorial records than most U.S. senators who served several terms.

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Did You Know That: ND native Mary Osborne made musical history

For two decades, the 1940s and 1950s, the best female jazz guitarist in the nation was a North Dakota native.

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Did You Know That: ‘Queen of the Jazz Guitar’ born and raised in North Dakota

The person known as “Queen of the Jazz Guitar,” the first woman to play the electric guitar professionally, was born and raised in North Dakota.

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Did You Know That: FDR chose ND native to steer nation through banking crisis

Following the collapse of Wall Street in 1929, a banking crisis arose that contributed to the ruination of the American economy.

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Did You Know That: Fargo man received European honors

Louis B. Hanna was decorated as a Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Norwegian Order of St. Olav in 1915. In 1918, he was decorated by the French government as an officer of the French Legion of Honor.

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Did You Know That: ND Republican worked to elect president in 1912

The man who was chairman of the North Dakota Republican State Committee from 1902 to 1908 rejected the incumbent Republican U.S. president in 1912 and led the fight to try tod get another man elected at the March primary. How did this Republican rebel fare as a result?

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Eriksmoen: One of nation’s first female film directors was Casselton native

In 1916, “America’s Sweetheart,” Mary Pickford, selected Casselton, N.D., native Angela Gibson to be her assistant director for the movie “The Pride of the Clan.” Pickford selected Gibson because of “her well-known knowledge of Scottish costumes and folklore.”

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Eriksmoen: Baseball player Shepard broke barriers for disabled

Bert Shepard was the only person with only one leg to play major league baseball. He later spent parts of two seasons playing semi-professional baseball in Williston, N.D.

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Eriksmoen: One-legged player made baseball history

It has been speculated that a person with only one leg was the best baseball pitcher in North Dakota in 1947.

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Did You Know That: The surprising life of Homer Sprague

When political boss Alexander McKenzie tried to get the Louisiana Lottery implemented in North Dakota in 1889, he failed. One of the most effective spokesmen leading the opposition was the highly moralistic president of the University of North Dakota, Homer B. Sprague, an eminent scholar and acclaimed orator.

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Columns

Eriksmoen: Towns, regions came together when the circus came to ND

For 130 years, the circus has provided entertainment for the residents of North Dakota.

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Eriksmoen: ND man ‘changed the face of public humanities’

In many ways, the North Dakota Humanities program became the template or model for the rest of the country.

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Eriksmoen: Father of modern Chautauqua considered ND best place to live

The father of the modern Chautauqua in America considered North Dakota as the greatest place on earth to live.

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‘Father of forward pass’ coached football in Fargo

"The father of the forward pass," who is also credited with being the first person to put numbers on the jerseys of his football players, coached college football in Fargo.

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Woodcutter one of first ND lawmen to die in line of duty

George Custer’s first adversary upon arriving at Fort Abraham Lincoln in Dakota Territory was not Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse or any of the other northern Plains Indian leaders, but a woodcutter.

Eriksmoen: North Dakotan called ‘one-man army’ for WWII heroics

On Sept. 22, 1944, an Army officer from south-central North Dakota singlehandedly wiped out five German machine gun nests and captured 19 prisoners.

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Did You Know That: Composer helped establish NDSU music school

Last Sept. 26, the North Dakota State Board of Higher Education officially recognized the School of Music at North Dakota State University. This means the university is now part of a small group of accredited institutions nationwide designated as Schools of Music that offer a variety of academic programs, including the doctorate in performance and conducting.

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Brother of ND murder victim went on to study with Hemingway

The 1931 murder of 24-year-old Hedvig “Sammy” Samuelson from White Earth, N.D., deeply affected her kid brother.

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Eriksmoen: Several people close to John F. Kennedy assassination had ties to North Dakota

The recent return of Clint Hill to his hometown of Washburn got me thinking about people with North Dakota ties who were associated with the events involving President John F. Kennedy’s assassination and the controversy surrounding it.

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Small ND town of Sarles has ties to two state leaders

Only one organized town in North Dakota was named for a state governor. That town was also the birthplace of a future state executive.

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