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Published May 06, 2009, 12:00 AM

Dairy farmer shares his success with Alexandria group

For Jerry Jennissen and his family dairy farm, sustainability is a lifestyle. Jennissen and his family own Jer-Lindy Farms, near Brooten. Every day, he milks 140 cows twice a day. Corn and alfalfa are also grown on the 240-acre farm.

For Jerry Jennissen and his family dairy farm, sustainability is a lifestyle. Jennissen and his family own Jer-Lindy Farms, near Brooten.

Every day, he milks 140 cows twice a day. Corn and alfalfa are also grown on the 240-acre farm.

The most important measure of success at the end of the day is knowing that their actions help create a more sustainable environment while providing people in the community with wholesome dairy foods.

Jennissen shared his passion for producing wholesome milk with the Belles Letters Club of Alexandria on April 20.

Jennissen, like many, works hard, cares for his family and wants only the best for them, especially when it comes to wholesome food.

Jennissen, however, has some insider knowledge; he already knows that the milk, cheese and yogurt available to all their families are wholesome and high quality foods.

“What dairy farmers do on their farms is the starting point for safe, nutritious dairy foods in the supermarket,” said Jennissen. “Dairy farmers and their families are consumers too. We drink the same milk and eat the same dairy products you do.

“We love what we do,” said Jennissen. “Dairy farmers across Minnesota differ in the number of cows they milk and some of the particular ways they farm, but we all share a passion for what we do. It is our responsibility to take care of the natural resources and animals on our farm and we take that responsibility with a great deal of pride and commitment.”

The family lives and works on the farm and that is strong incentive to protecting the land, water and air. In addition, cow comfort and health are carefully monitored every single day. Jennissen works with an expert dairy animal nutritionist to formulate the best diets for the cows and veterinarians come to the farm regularly to check on the animals’ health.

Advancements in technology, animal husbandry and milk quality methods are put to use. Because of this commitment at the dairy farm, people can count on wholesome dairy foods produced while sustaining the environment, Jennissen said.

To learn more about the people behind the product – dairy farmers and the milk they produce – visit www.midwestdairy.com or www.dairyfarmingtoday.org.

Midwest Dairy Association is a non-profit organization that provides consumers with information about the nutrition and wholesomeness of dairy foods, and conducts research and promotional programs. Programs are financed and directed by more than 13,000 dairy producers in nine states: Arkansas, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota and eastern Oklahoma.

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