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Published July 13, 2012, 09:14 AM

NDSU FeedList connects livestock feed buyers, sellers

FARGO - Abnormally dry conditions in western North Dakota have many livestock producers needing additional forage this year.

By: NDSU Extension Service, INFORUM

FARGO - Abnormally dry conditions in western North Dakota have many livestock producers needing additional forage this year.

Farmers and ranchers who have feedstuff such as hay or corn for sale can list it on North Dakota State University's FeedList website, which is designed to connect feed sellers and buyers. Producers also may list pasture they have for rent.

FeedList, at http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/feedlist, shows what each seller has for sale, how the feed is stored (large round bales, small bales, etc.) and the seller's contact information. Prospective buyers can select what they want to buy and contact the sellers. Using FeedList is free of charge.

North Dakota producers who want to buy or have feed to sell should contact their county Extension Service office to have the information added to FeedList. Out- of-state buyers and sellers can use an online form to submit their information.

Buyers and sellers who no longer need FeedList's services should contact their county Extension office or the database's manager, Bob Bertsch, at robert.bertsch@ndsu.edu to have the entry removed.

The FeedList website also has links to similar services in other states and information on needed and available feedlots and truckers for hire.

Unusually dry conditions have been a problem in far western North Dakota since August or September 2011, according to Roger Ashley, North Dakota State University Extension Service agronomist at the Dickinson Research Extension Center. Plus, freezing temperatures in May 2012 injured growing alfalfa plants, and the alfalfa weevil is plaguing the area.

"The growth of plants in pastures and hay fields is very short for some to the extent that these fields will not be grazed or harvested this year," Ashley says.

FeedList has been available during feed shortages since the late 1970s.

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