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Published February 20, 2009, 11:38 AM

AGParts Worldwide started in a couple of basement workshops

When Scott Dulon graduated from Hudson High School in 1992 he had a plan to become an electrician. Soon after technical school he went to work for his Uncle, Bob Dulon, repairing parts for laptop commuters.

By: Margaret Ontl, Hudson Star-Observer

When Scott Dulon graduated from Hudson High School in 1992 he had a plan to become an electrician. Soon after technical school he went to work for his Uncle, Bob Dulon, repairing parts for laptop commuters.

Today, his uncle works for Scott at AGParts Worldwide, which just expanded its facilities at 2000 O’Neil Road to include 9,000 square feet. Scott began working on his own in 2000.

Basically, two guys working out of their basements — Scott in Hudson and Jamie Hidalgo in Pennsylvania, who was a vendor Scott met while working for his uncle — teamed up to create AGParts Worldwide in 2002.

Today, the company has offices in four locations, Hudson, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and Toronto, and has nearly 100 employees, 18 in Hudson (many members of Dulon’s family).

Eric Steingraber signed on early with Scott, joining him in 2002 as sales manager, a position he still holds today.

AGParts Worldwide sells spare parts for laptop computers, dealing mostly with corporations that offer repair services. Originally, the only parts they worked with were LCDs.

“LCDs were 90 percent of our business when we started. That was our main focus,” said Steingraber. “From there we found the value in the printed circuit boards.”

One of the tools, AGParts offers in its technical box of services is a very high-end machine that raises the temperature of little beads of solder. The solder holds parts of a printed circuit board in place at just the right temperature, not too hot, not too cold, so the technician can remove and replace parts of the board.

Nearly everything is done with microscopic precision, and the repair work is done in a clean-room environment separated from the shipping and inventory areas. A glance down the workbench finds laptops in various stages of assembly with tools, scopes and magnifying tools at the ready.

Now, the PCB portion of the business nearly exceeds the LCD portion. Today AGParts is a business repair facility with authorization from manufacturers such as Toshiba.

“It is still a lot cheaper to fix a laptop than it is to get a new one,” said Dulon. “One of the biggest reasons we have been able to expand is the good relationship we have established with OEMs, original equipment manufacturers. We can buy their excess inventory.”

The Hudson team includes six workers in sales, four in administration, five technicians, two in shipping and one in materials.

AGParts Worldwide’s main customers are in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Mexico and Germany as well as the United States. The company does not deal directly with the public.

For more information, visit www.agpartsworldwide.com.

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