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Published May 13, 2011, 12:00 AM

Kovels Antiques: Porcelain once trumped gold as valued item

Gold is selling for very high prices today, but porcelain was more precious than gold in 17th-century Europe. Thin white porcelain was first made in China in the 10th century, but it wasn’t seen in Europe until 1260, when some pieces were brought back by Marco Polo.

By: Terry Kovel, INFORUM

Gold is selling for very high prices today, but porcelain was more precious than gold in 17th-century Europe. Thin white porcelain was first made in China in the 10th century, but it wasn’t seen in Europe until 1260, when some pieces were brought back by Marco Polo. It was treasured as a rarity and valued like gold, but Europeans couldn’t figure out how it was made.

In 1700 Augustus the Strong, the elector of Saxony (Germany), heard that Johann Bottger, an 18-year-old German, was trying to make gold from base metals. Augustus kept Bottger a prisoner in Dresden to make gold. At the same time, another scientist with the long name Ehrenfried Walther von Tschirnhaus was working to discover the secret of the other treasure, porcelain. Tschirnhaus and Bottger were told to work together, and porcelain was finally created in 1713. Augustus was pleased and built a royal porcelain factory in the city of Meissen.

But the secret of porcelain was out, and it soon was made in many countries. For centuries, Bottger was credited with the discovery of porcelain, but now research suggests it was really Tschirnhaus.

Many types of ceramics – majolica, stoneware, bone china, ironstone and pottery – were soon being used in households for tasks such as cooking and storing. Decorations included ceramic figurines and tiles. It is not surprising that artists sometimes pay homage to ceramics in the designs they create on ceramics. Well-known designs include a famous Chinese pattern picturing urns and vases, a Japanese Satsuma lidded jar picturing Asian ceramics from many different centuries, and English and American dinnerware sets decorated with examples of 1950s dishes.


Q: A few years ago, I bought a 27-inch round mahogany side table at a local antiques shop. It stands on four square tapered legs and has a fluted set of four drawers all around it. Only one of the drawers is real. The other three are false drawers. There’s a metal label inside the real drawer that reads “Kittinger Authentic Handmade.” Please tell me its history and value.

A: Kittinger Furniture Co. has been in business in Buffalo, N.Y., since 1866. It has a reputation for making high-quality furniture in traditional styles. If you bought your table “a few years ago,” it’s worth about 20 percent less than what you paid then. Prices for many vintage furniture pieces have not gone up in the last few years. We have seen tables like yours selling for $200 to $500. Older pieces in excellent condition sell for a little less.


Q: I would like information about a liquor decanter I was given about 20 years ago. It’s in the shape of a sailboat. The bottom of the decanter is marked “Famous Firsts, Edition No. 5, 1851 Yacht America, 1970, R.E.M. Originals.” Is it valuable?

A: Famous Firsts Ltd. of Port Chester, N.Y., made limited edition figural liquor decanters from 1968 until 1985. The initials on the bottom of your bottle are those of Richard E. Magid, the owner of Famous Firsts. The designs were based on “famous firsts,” like the first yacht race. In 1851, the yacht “America” won the first race between the United States and England in what became known as the “America’s Cup.” The name honors the winner of the first race. Other Famous Firsts decanters include famous cars, planes, ships, phonographs, sewing machines and telephones. Your decanter sold for $50 when it was new. The value of figural ceramic liquor bottles have plummeted, though, and it’s worth about $25 or less today.


Q: We have a porcelain plate, approximately 17 inches in diameter, that has a hand-painted scene of trees and of ducks swimming in a pond. The bottom is marked “LM & Cie Montereau.” The plate has been in our family for about 70 years. Can you tell us who made it?

A: The “LM & Cie” mark was used by Leboeuf, Milliet & Co. of Creil and Montereau, France. The company was founded in 1841 by Louis Martin Leboeuf (1792-1854) and Jean Baptiste Gratien Milliet (1797-1875) and was in business until 1895.


Tip

Never store photographs with rubber bands or paper clips. Store photos in acid-free boxes or envelopes, available at specialty stores and through mail-order catalogs.


For more information about antiques and collectibles and free price information, visit Kovel’s website, www.kovels.com

Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any Kovel forum. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovel, The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

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