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Published January 27, 2014, 09:38 AM

New hard red spring wheat superior to ‘Traverse’

South Dakota wheat growers will soon have access to a new hard red spring wheat variety. After several years of research, the South Dakota State University Agricultural Experiment Station recently released Prevail to certified growers.

By: SDSU ,

BROOKINGS, S.D. — South Dakota wheat growers will soon have access to a new hard red spring wheat variety. After several years of research, the South Dakota State University Agricultural Experiment Station recently released Prevail to certified growers.

Prevail is a hard red spring wheat cultivar derived as a single spike from within an F4 population that was originally created in fall 2002. Tests carried out at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Spring Wheat Quality Laboratory in Fargo, N.D., demonstrated that most milling and baking quality parameters associated with Prevail are similar to Brick, Select, Faller and Briggs, but superior to those of Traverse, explains Karl Glover, SDSU spring wheat breeder.

“Prevail has high yield potential and test weight, it contains adequate grain protein concentration, it is relatively short in stature and has moderate levels of resistance to fusarium head blight,” Glover says.

Before Prevail could be released, a Variety Release Committee at SDSU scrutinized its performance. Upon its recommendation, Daniel Scholl, director of the South Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station and Associate Dean of Research for the College of Agriculture and Biological Sciences approved its release.

Now that it has been released into the South Dakota Crop Improvement Association seed certification program, it is currently in foundation seed increase. Prevail will ultimately be made available as certified seed through the efforts of the South Dakota Crop Improvement Association.

Scholl says its release is a perfect example of how the synergy between the Land Grant University, SDSU Extension and the SDSU Agricultural Experiment Station impacts the economic future of the state’s agriculture industry.

“We are a public research organization here to serve the interests of agriculture and the food consuming public,” Scholl says. “The value of having a wheat breeding program in our state is the fact that varieties developed here are adapted specifically to the growing conditions here in South Dakota.”

4 years of research

When compared over 32 South Dakota Advanced Yield Trials location-years, (eight locations, four years) Prevail, Faller, Advance and Traverse all produced statistically similar amounts of grain (approximately 44.8 bushels per acre).

Test weight of Prevail (57.7 pounds per bushel) was significantly less than Brick (58.7) and Forefront (58.4 pounds per bushel), but statistically similar to Advance (57.9), Select (57.7) Briggs (57.4) and ‘Steele-ND’ (57.3).

Grain protein concentration of Prevail (14.9 percent) was statistically similar to Traverse (14.9 percent), Faller (14.8 percent), Advance (14.8 percent), though significantly lower than Steele-ND (15.6 percent), Forefront (15.5 percent), Briggs (15.4 percent), Select (15.1 percent) and Brick (15.1 percent). Prevail (32.4 inches) is similar in height to Advance (31.9 inches) and both are significantly shorter than the remaining comparison cultivars.

Fusarium head blight disease index scores of Prevail (23.1 percent) are significantly higher than those of Brick (18.5 percent), however, its Fusarium damaged kernel scores are similar (15.4 and 13.4 percent, respectively), and both are significantly lower than those of Advance (24.7 percent), Select (25.1 percent), Traverse (26.3 percent) and Briggs (27.4 percent).

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