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Published January 09, 2014, 11:09 AM

Study looks at grain flow from US to Canada

A new study from the Canada-U.S. Task Group, a group of Canadian and U.S. nonprofit and trade organizations, documents the commercial flow of grain from the U.S. to Canada.

By: Agweek staff report,

A new study from the Canada-U.S. Task Group, a group of Canadian and U.S. nonprofit and trade organizations, documents the commercial flow of grain from the U.S. to Canada.

The study addresses U.S. and Canadian trade volume, handling and processing practices for more than 15 commodities traded between the two countries. The analysis was provided to the Canadian and U.S. governments as input in the consultations for the development of phytosanitary measures under Canada’s proposed Grain Import Framework.

The study examined data from 2010 to 2012. On average, corn is the No. 1 commodity moving north from the U.S. to Canada at 1.05 million metric tons (MT) per year. Average soybean exports to Canada are 245,000 MT while wheat exports are 69,000 MT.

According to the study, 54 percent of all U.S. grain exports to Canada were transported by truck, followed by rail at 32 percent and water at 14 percent. The high percentage of truck movements highlighted a potential problem if inspections and certificates would be required on each shipment. But, based on the risk assessments of the various crops and taking into consideration their end-use in Canada, it is expected that only a small number of these U.S. shipments will require a phytosanitary certificate.

The study also found that Canadian processing practices generally minimize phytosanitary risks that might arise from U.S. shipments. The commodities are typically cleaned at the recipient’s facility and screenings are heated, hammered and turned into feed or sent to landfills that mitigate phytosanitary risks.

Canadian and U.S. organizations formed the Canada-U.S. Task Group in April 2012 and have been working together to communicate cross-border trade information.

The study is available online at www.canada-usgrainandseedtrade.info.

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