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Published September 03, 2013, 10:45 AM

For the ladies

The organizers of the Big Iron traditional Ladies Lunch and Style Show pride themselves on giving female farm enthusiasts and farm wives a break from farm machinery demonstrations and agricultural seminars.

By: Will Powell, Agweek

The organizers of the Big Iron Farm Show’s traditional Ladies Lunch and Style Show, held at the Great Hall of the Fargo Holiday Inn, pride themselves on giving female farm enthusiasts and farm wives a break from farm machinery demonstrations and agricultural seminars.

“It is a style show, a luncheon, and a celebration of agriculture,” says Judi Lundstrom, co-chairperson of the Big Iron Ladies Committee. “This committee is charged with putting together a luncheon on Sept. 11. It’s focus is on the women who attend Big Iron, to give them something other than tractors to look at.”

“Some are farm wives, some think of it as a good way to spend a morning,” says Mary Morken, co-chairperson of the Big Iron Ladies Committee.

The Ladies Lunch and Style Show has been a part of the Big Iron Farm Show for more than 30 years, and attendance has always been strong. For 2013’s luncheon, Morken and Lundstrom are expecting at least 400 participants. The luncheon’s order of events and menu do not vary much from year-to-year, and the ladies prefer it that way.

Chicken crepes, a favorite meal of luncheon participants, will be served this year.It’s something unique and different … everybody likes them,” Morken says.

The luncheon will begin with a welcome from Ilene McClean, master of ceremonies, and include door prize contests and a style show featuring fashion from Fargo’s Coldwater Creek, Dress Barn and Christopher and Banks clothing stores.

“They talk a little bit about forward-fashion,” Lundstrom says of the luncheon’s style show.

The Dixie Cups, a group of local female musicians, will perform during the luncheon. Primarily a pop and oldies cover band, the Dixie Cups got their start playing at the Ladies Lunch and Style Show and 2013 will be the fourth year they’ve performed at the luncheon.

“We have had entertainment [that] might be part of the agricultural community, but for the most part, our entertainment is musical,” Lundstrom says.

Morken, Lundstrom and the rest of the Big Iron Ladies Committee have long histories of assisting the Red River Valley Fair show through various roles. Morken invited Lundstrom to join the luncheon’s planning committee in 2010. Tthe luncheon’s positive social effect on the Big Iron Farm Show made her decision to join the committee an easy one.

“It just intrigued me that they were getting this done in a timely fashion for an event that primarily attracts men, but I would say that 20 to 25 percent of the attendees at Big Iron tend to be women, so it was just another service that we could provide for the women … this was just another way of giving back to the Red River Valley Fair. And the group of ladies is really fun,” Lundstrom says.

“It’s the whole package. The food is good, and the entertainment is great,” Morken says.

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