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Published March 31, 2009, 12:00 AM

Soybean Ambassador Program launched

MANKATO — The Minnesota Soybean Research and Promotion Council has introduced a new Soybean Ambassador Program for students ages 18 to 22 who are enrolled in a two- or four-year post-secondary education program related to agriculture.

MANKATO — The Minnesota Soybean Research and Promotion Council has introduced a new Soybean Ambassador Program for students ages 18 to 22 who are enrolled in a two- or four-year post-secondary education program related to agriculture.

“The Soybean Ambassador Program is designed to create a learning environment for the development of new, young leaders in the soybean industry,” said Ryan Gravenhof, a soybean farmer from Worthington. “We need to provide as much support and encouragement as we can to help the next generation of producers, researchers, agronomists and ag engineers.”

Post-secondary ag students who have strong communication and leadership skills can earn a $1,000 scholarship as well as other stipends and awards based on participation.

“The individual chosen as the Soybean Ambassador will serve as a spokesperson for the Minnesota Soybean Research & Promotion Council, participate in soybean council activities, attend the Ag Ambassador Institute in July, help at Farmfest and the Minnesota State Fair.” Gravenhof said. “This isn’t a full-time job, it can easily be adapted to a student’s class and work schedule.”

The deadline to apply is April 15. For more information, call Veronica Bruckhoff, Ambassador program coordinator at the Minnesota Soybean office at (507) 388-1635, or visit the Minnesota Soybean Web site at www.mnsoybean.com.

The Minnesota Soybean Research & Promotion Council (MSR&PC) consists of an elected board of 15 soybean producers from the crop reporting districts in the state.

The improved mission of the council is to invest soybean checkoff dollars in well-defined research, marketing, education and commercialization programs designed to increase demand and thereby the profitability of Minnesota’s soybean famers.

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