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Published September 04, 2012, 10:21 AM

Hot, dry weather hits row crops

Hot, dry conditions persist throughout the region, and are pushing row crops toward maturity. Here is a summary of the National Agricultural Statistics Service weekly crop and weather reports, released Aug. 27.

By: Mikkel Pates, Agweek

FARGO, N.D. — Hot, dry conditions persist throughout the region, and are pushing row crops toward maturity. Here is a summary of the National Agricultural Statistics Service weekly crop and weather reports, released Aug. 27.

MINNESOTA — The corn crop stood at 17 percent poor or very poor, compared with 15 the previous week. At least 75 percent of the crop was in the dent stage, up from 35 percent for the five-year average.

Soybeans are 12 percent poor or worse, compared with 11 percent the previous week. Some 26 percent were turning yellow as of Aug. 27, compared with 8 percent for the five-year average. Canola was 83 percent harvested and 71 percent of the crop was in the good or excellent category. Some 30 percent of the dry beans were dropping pods and 65 percent are in good to excellent condition.

Mankato is nearly 6 inches behind normal precipitation for the growing season, while Duluth is 8 inches above normal. In the southwest part of the state, Worthington is 2 inches behind for the cropping season, while Pipestone is 3.3 percent above the five-year average.

NORTH DAKOTA — Corn is ranked 18 percent poor or very poor, compared with 16 percent the previous week. About 62 percent was dented, compared with a five-year average of 19 percent for this date. Five percent was mature.

Soybeans are 16 percent poor or very poor, compared with 14 percent the previous week. About 42 percent of the fields had lower leaves turning yellow, compared with 12 percent for a five-year average.

About 13 percent of the dry edible beans in the state are in the poor to very poor category, while 57 percent are rated good or better. Some 17 percent of the beans have been cut, compared with a five-year average of 2 percent.

Topsoil moisture conditions are short in 67 percent of the state, and subsoil is short or worse in 64 percent of the state.

SOUTH DAKOTA — Temperatures climb and crop ratings go downhill. Corn is 55 percent poor or very poor, compared with 44 percent the previous week. Some 66 percent of the crop is in the dent stage, compared with 27 percent for the five-year average.

Soybeans are 44 percent poor or very poor, up from 31 percent the previous week. Twenty-six percent were dropping leaves, up from a 7 percent average.

Northeast and eastern areas of the state are mostly 2 to 4 inches below averages for growing season precipitation, but the southwest, southeast and central parts of the state are more than 4 inches below normal. Rapid City is 7 inches below normal. Philip is 9.6 inches down for the growing season. Centerville is 10.2 inches below normal since April 1.

MONTANA — Corn condition was poor or worse in 14 percent of the state, up from 18 percent the previous week.

Harvest percentages compared with five-year averages were: barley — 73 percent, 51 percent average; camelina — 30 percent, 83 percent average; canola — 38 percent, 40 percent average; silage corn — 18 percent, average not available; dry peas, 94 percent, 83 percent average; lentils — 93 percent, 75 percent average; durum — 86 percent, 39 percent average; spring wheat — 73 percent, 46 percent average; winter wheat — 97 percent, 87 percent average.

Range and pasture conditions are 64 percent poor or very poor, compared with 65 percent the previous week and a five-year average of 22 percent. Northeast Montana is largely equal to averages for growing season moisture. The central part of the state is 2.5 to 4 inches behind normal, and southeast counties are 1.5 to 4.6 inches behind normal for the cropping season since April 1.

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