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Published January 11, 2011, 03:37 PM

Speakers to tackle glyphosate resistance

FARGO, N.D. — International experts on glyphosate weed resistance will speak on the topic Jan. 12 in Fargo, N.D. Peterson Farms Seed of Prosper, N.D., and Bayer CropScience are co-hosting an event on the topic.

By: Mikkel Pates, Agweek

FARGO, N.D. — International experts on glyphosate weed resistance will speak on the topic Jan. 12 in Fargo, N.D. Peterson Farms Seed of Prosper, N.D., and Bayer CropScience are co-hosting an event on the topic. The event will be held from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Fargo Holiday Inn, with a lunch to follow. It’s free and no advance registration is necessary. Speakers include:

- Stephen Powles, director of the Western Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative. Powles is with the University of Western Australia. He has traveled the world speaking about managing glyphosate resistance after seeing the effects of glyphasate-resistance ryegrass wreak havoc in his homeland.

- Ford Baldwin, owner of Practical Weed Consultants, L.L.C., of Austin, Ark. Baldwin is a weed scientist and specializes in weeds of rice, soybeans, wheat and cotton. Before forming his consulting company, he was an extension service weed scientist at the University of Arkansas.

- Michael Christoffers, an associate professor at North Dakota State University in Fargo, teaches weed science and genetics. Christoffers received a bachelor’s degree at NDSU and a doctorate in 1998 form the University of Missouri Genetics Area Program.Discussions will focus on how soon local growers should worry about problems, including Palmer pigweeds, fields not harvested because resistant weeds overrun the crop, or $200 an acre on additional weed control methods, or producers being forced out of business because of resistance, says Peterson Farms Seed in its release. “These are actual scenarios facing producers in the mid-South,” the release says. “Fortunately, local growers have the advantage of being ahead of the situation.” Giant ragweed, waterhemp, and kochia weeds are common in the Red River Valley of eastern North Dakota and northwestern Minnesota, and these species already have confirmed glyphosate resistance in other states. The visiting experts think it will cost less to change management practices now rather than wait until the resistance problems hit fields. Information: Julie Peterson 701-282-7476, or Julie@petersonfarmsseed.com.

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