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ND farmer appointed UN special ambassador

ND farmer appointed UN special ambassador

Robert Carlson, former president of the World Farmers’ Organisation and a North Dakota famer, has been appointed United Nations Special Ambassador of the International Year of Family Farming.

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Some Minn. E. coli cases linked to restaurant chain

More than a dozen cases of foodborne illness are being investigated by the Minnesota Department of Health — some from people who reported eating at Minnesota Applebee’s restaurants during a four-day period in June.

Dunking for dollars

Dunking for dollars

I guess I was the closest thing to a local celebrity they could think of in my nearby town of Rugby, N.D., when the Lutheran church was recruiting victims and honorees for their dunking booth at the Pierce County Fair.

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Heart attacks common around harvest time

Heart attacks common around harvest time

During harvest season and even when farmers are gearing up for harvest, rural areas see a large number of heart attacks, says Dr. Thomas Haldis, an interventional cardiologist and medical director of the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory at Sanford Health in Fargo, N.D.

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Business ‘visionary’ Bert Johnson dies

Business ‘visionary’ Bert Johnson dies

Bert Johnson was a prominent farmer, businessman and landowner in the northern Red River Valley and someone who never turned down the opportunity to make a deal.

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Gardening for self sufficiency

Gardening for self sufficiency

I grew up with a garden, not that I was always appreciative of the fact or thrilled with the idea of pulling weeds or picking beans. I did like the tilling. Like most young boys, the tiller with its noisy gas motor and the ability to power pulverize dirt and old plants and weeds had its allure.

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Soybean growers welcome higher biodiesel blend, but there are critics

Soybean growers welcome higher biodiesel blend, but there are critics

Spring was wet and difficult, and many of Bill and Karolyn Zurn’s late-planted soybeans are still small and scant in the soggy soil. The Callaway, Minn., farm couple won’t harvest a good crop this fall unless the rest of the growing season cooperates.

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Regent, N.D., farm celebrates 100 years

Regent, N.D., farm celebrates 100 years

In 100 years, many things have changed in rural Regent. Horses pulling plows to sow fields have been replaced by sophisticated, motorized farm equipment equipped with hydraulics and global positioning systems. There are also far fewer farm families in the area than there were a century ago.

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8 hospitalized in horse riding accident: young boy airlifted to Bismarck with injuries

Eight minors were hospitalized Monday afternoon after being bucked from their horses during a trail ride near the Medora riding stables.

More rain ends planting

More rain ends planting

The last thing farmers in Minnesota’s Becker and Mahnomen counties wanted was more rain.

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Support for farming

Support for farming

I’d like to remind farmers that they still have a lot of fans.

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Spring a hopeful time on the prairie

Spring a hopeful time on the prairie

The seed is in the ground, the grass is growing, our mare had her colt and the calves have all stood up and gotten their first meal at the momma cow cafe. It’s a hopeful time here on the prairie.

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No winner in sugar trade war

No winner in sugar trade war

I talked once with a guy, an American, shortly after he returned from vacation in Mexico. He told of how he’d wanted to eat “authentic” Mexican food, not “tourist” food. So he walked past two restaurants filled with tourists eating fried chicken; no “tourist” food for him. Finally, he found a restaurant serving local residents and ate “authentic” food with them. “Well, what did you have?” I asked. He hesitated an instant (he’d clearly told the story before; his timing was perfect) and said, “Fried chicken.”

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Family steps up after death of sheep industry giant

Family steps up after death of sheep industry giant

Dion Van Well towered over the sheep industry in the Upper Midwest like few do. He was dubbed the “Lion of the Lambs,” in a 2009 Agweek story, and his family vows to continue his legacy. Van Well, 47, died in his sleep of heart failure on Jan. 5 while on a pheasant hunting trip with buddies near Hoven, S.D.

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Freezer space

Freezer space

Don’t bite off more than you can chew. Make sure your eyes aren’t bigger than your stomach, or your plate, or something like that. Don’t feed three cattle to make into beef if you don’t have the room to keep them frozen.

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